Where Can I Buy A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Best Price In St Lucie Village FL


Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24
So far, it doesn't seem to be showing many signs of wear and tear. The padded frame mat looks a little shoddy now, which is disappointing after such a short period of time, but on an up note it's easier to put on. I would like to think that's because I've gotten stronger in the intervening time, but really it's more likely that the elastic portions are getting stretched out from repeated use. For the moment, it still does its job of giving a little bit of cushion to the frame itself, though without metal springs to protect me from it seems a bit extraneous.

This is a great trampoline. My 5 yo loves it, and has had it for a couple years. He jumps on it a lot and it still looks new. The handle is nice for extra balance (although as my child has gotten older he doesn't hold the handle as much). The fabric around the outside keeps them from jumping through the ropes on accident. The legs can pull off for storage, but we have never stored it, it gets used all the time. I've seen other brands of trampolines at friend's houses, and they either don't have the fabric outside (dangerous) or they are already saggy in the middle (lame) or they have lots of extra buttons and gadgets on the front for noises or sounds or something (unnecessary). This one seems great.
The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up. Trampoline Park Safety Standards Act
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7', enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too!
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10

You will find much more information about trampolines, the health benefits of trampoline exercise and the various safety aspects to consider and a review of other popular trampolines on the market today.


The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.

I have used a rebounder in Hawaii for over 20 years, bought another one in Australia and got another one this last month...Locally I have carried it with me in the car and on planes.It is far better impact on my feet/ ankles/legs than pounding on concrete surfaces. Found a great book with many many specific exercises, made a chart of them and laminated it so it can go with me too.30 minutes of simply jogging have been an excellent 'wake up' exercise for me in the AM and a gentle 'slow down' at night.
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.
While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.
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Springs and Springless Trampolines: When purchasing a trampoline or replacing springs ensure that the springs are galvanized to prevent corroding. As a general rule the larger the trampoline the more springs a trampoline will require and the longer and thicker the springs should be.
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.
To keep the safety net and surface of your trampoline optimized for hazard-free jumping, set up the trampoline with safety accessories and position it in the best possible way. Covering the frame, bars, edges, springs, hooks, safety net poles, etc. with shock-absorbing protective padding helps to prevent cuts and bumps and minimize the danger of falls.

Trampoline Jump Mat: The trampoline mat may have holes in it caused by things falling on it like branches or fireworks (a common culprit!) or even a cigarette end. The trampoline mat (or jump mat as it is sometimes known) can be replaced. You will need to know the size of your trampoline, the shape of it and the number of springs it has to attach to. You may also need a spring tool to remove the old trampoline mat and install the new one. It can be hard work to do this without a spring tool. Make sure that any new trampoline mat is made of A grade Permatron Polypropylene, which is UV resistant, and sewn with UV resistant thread. The V rings to attach to the springs should also be galvanised to prevent rust.
~ In 1996 we invented what is widely recognized as the most important trampoline safety innovation ever; the trampoline safety net. It's protected millions of kids around the world – maybe even yours. Today, 17 safety patents later, we continue to lead the industry making trampolines engineered to our exacting safety and quality standards, and built to last.

Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.

Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012


The AAP recommends not purchasing or using any size recreational trampoline for your home, or using one at other homes or on playgrounds. Trampolines should only be used as part of a supervised training program in gymnastics, diving, or other competitive sport. Most importantly, only one person should be training on the trampoline at a time, and always under direct supervision.
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in their online article Physical Activity and the Health of Young People, states that "children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease." (For full text and references please click here)
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
The NEISS data showed that the youngest kids are at greatest risk for significant injury, including fractures of the legs and spine. Studies have shown that children younger than 6 years old accounted for 22 to 37 percent of all those turning up in the emergency room for evaluation. And NEISS data show that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48 percent in kids 5 years and younger.
To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."
The surface is heavy-duty, too, and the rebounding surface even has a safety pad. This trampoline has thirty-band tension resistance, and each band is about two inches wide, so you can be sure of reliability and durability. The trampoline includes a limited manufacturer's warranty, and this means the frame is warrantied for one year and the parts for 90 days.
When you use a rebounder trampoline you will constantly be practicing your balance and building the muscles which help keep you on your feet. As you get older, the threat that a fall can have on your body becomes increasingly more dangerous. Nobody likes to hear that a loved one has broken a bone because they fell down. Especially when it is one of our elderly loved ones. The older you get, the more fragile your muscles get. Save your friends and family the heartbreak and keep up with your balancing muscles so that we never have to receive that call.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
Trampoline Spring Padding. Probably the most likely part to need replacing on your trampoline is the spring padding. Over the years the fabric, however well made, will deteriorate under strong sunshine and in heavy winds. The cold weather can also make it brittle which results in it cracking. It is important not to use the trampoline without any spring padding as someone could fall on the frame and receive an injury if it is not protected.

Trampolining is a low impact, low stress workout for the body. 10 – 20 minutes of trampolining is about equal to half an hour of jogging! Because the trampoline mat absorbs some of the shock of impact, there is no strain on the joints. A repeated low impact exercise builds and strengthens the bones and muscles which results in toning, better balance, co-ordination and good posture. It has also been proven to reduce the risk of arthritis and osteoporosis.
Encourage them to bounce in the centre of the trampoline and keep other children back away from the trampoline. Never let them go underneath a trampoline.
Trampolining is a low impact, low stress workout for the body. 10 – 20 minutes of trampolining is about equal to half an hour of jogging! Because the trampoline mat absorbs some of the shock of impact, there is no strain on the joints. A repeated low impact exercise builds and strengthens the bones and muscles which results in toning, better balance, co-ordination and good posture. It has also been proven to reduce the risk of arthritis and osteoporosis.
Of course we went over all of the common excuses that grownups use to justify the purchase of a trampoline: it's good for our health, it keeps the lymphatic system working properly, it'll make our regular workouts more effective. And sure, all of that is true, but I think my wife and I both knew that we were going to make this investment because it was fun.

The particulars on this are pretty standard. All-steel frame construction with six detachable legs on a 36-inch diameter frame. It's pretty small, but large enough that one or the other of use can fit onto it and use it. It will also sit well in the living room without having to shift the coffee table around too much (have I mentioned how much I hate having to move things frequently?).

Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.


However, rebounder trampolines are normally only two to four feet in diameter and only a couple feet off the ground. This means you can store them in your house and use them for exercise purposes. After all, it is a lot more fun to jump on a big trampoline than a rebounder trampoline. However, rebounder trampolines are designed for exercise, not for fun.

Springs and Springless Trampolines: When purchasing a trampoline or replacing springs ensure that the springs are galvanized to prevent corroding. As a general rule the larger the trampoline the more springs a trampoline will require and the longer and thicker the springs should be.


The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
The trampoline was designed as a piece of specialized training equipment for specific sports. Pediatricians should only endorse use of trampolines as part of a structured training program with appropriate coaching, supervision, and safety measures in place. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, the following apply to trampolines used in the training setting:
The special feature of the urban rebounder trampoline is the two different sizes of hinge legs. These legs offer a versatile workout to the user. The frames in this trampoline are made up of solid metal with corrosion resistant technology. The bouncer mat is made up of highly durable mesh material. This trampoline folds easily and it occupies very small space for storage. The jumping surface is very soft and it is connected to the mat with the help of the springs. The weight bearing capacity of this trampoline is about 300 pounds and suits the best for adults and kids.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
If the trampoline has a welded frame check the condition of the welds carefully to ensure there is no fracture. This is a common area for the trampoline to fail, perhaps from overloading or just from a poor quality weld.
A fantastic way to prevent injuries and keep your kids safe on a trampoline is to install or maintain a strong safety net that protects both the jumper and the springs of the trampoline. Many trampoline models come with safety nets built into the design, and if not, you can purchase an enclosure net as an additional accessory and install it according to the size of your trampoline. 
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