How Can You Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Fort White FL


According to the royal society for the prevention of accidents approximately 75% of injuries occur when more than one person is on the trampoline with the person weighing less five times more likely to be injured. Children of a young age are particularly vulnerable to injury. Also unless the child is supervised by a trained 'spotter', adult supervision seems to do little to prevent accidents with about half of all injuries occurring with adult supervision.

Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.


Some trampoline models promoted as safe can have some major weaknesses and flaws particularly the budget trampolines which are often made of low quality materials and are poorly constructed. Ensure that the tubing used for the trampoline is of adequate thickness to prevent breakages and that the trampoline is not too light weight which may cause it to move around or flip over during use.
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"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."
With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.
The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  

Next came the padded frame mat. This was also very tight and difficult to do with one person. There are a number of holes in it where the bases of the legs go through. We both put it on and took it off the frame once by ourselves, but it was not easy and I already wasn't looking forward to putting it on every time I wanted to use the trampoline. It helped that the holes for the leg bases kept the pad from slipping, or I wouldn't have been able to do it by myself.
This Stamina product is meant for rebounding. Rebounding training is very beneficial to the body. It builds a cardiovascular workout by adding weights to hands and ankles. It stimulates the oxygen flow of the body and stimulates metabolism. For at home exercise, this product is extremely cheap and comfortable to use. So, now you do not need to make rounds to the gym.
Lay out a set of ground rules for what they can do on the trampoline. For example, make sure no toys are on the trampoline when jumping, and limit the number of people who can be on it at a time. This will help to ensure the weight limit isn't exceeded as well as reduce the likelihood of collisions while jumping. You can involve the kids in this step by getting them to help you come up with the list of rules. Have the kids help you make a big sign — poster, wood, whatever medium you can use — and keep it near the trampoline or posted near their other outdoor toys. Encourage all kids who play on the trampoline to be "rule enforcers" — it could help keep everyone on their best behavior and encourage them to report unsafe play immediately.
You may need to order a spring tool to help you remove the old ones and install the new ones. See the "bounce mat" section of this article for instructions on the method to use when removing and reinstalling a large number of the springs at one time.
I can actually say this is the first time in years I've really enjoyed exercising. I can do it anytime I want. Instead of sitting, I do exercises instead. Instead of taking a nap, I do some runs instead. And the best part, I know this is better for me & helps me get back in shape. Have already lost some pounds without even feeling like I'm depriving myself or on a diet. Just do this & watch what I eat. No more extra time for snacking.
Do either 1) small jumps where you barely leave the rebounder or 2) small movements where you don't leave the rebounder at all. You want your breathing to get faster and you want to break a sweat, but you don't want to be struggling to complete 10-15 minutes on your rebounder. To learn more about rebounding exercise, you can check out our blog post here.
- The handle of the trampoline does NOT fold down. The legs are really easy to fold, but the handle you have to unscrew. Mine is a tight fit and not easy to get back on as easily. Not the quick storage I thought it would be but to be honest, the kids are not happy when it gets put away so I have not really stored it for breaks like I thought I would anyway.
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"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."


"I think parents see the soft springy mat and they think it's safe, like water," LaBotz said. "What they don't realize is that once you get it to bouncing, especially if there are multiple users, it can be dangerous. Bigger kids and adults like to rocket propel up the little kids, getting them to bounce higher than they would otherwise and if the kid comes down wrong, it is the same as falling 9 or 10 feet onto a hard surface."
- The metal connections of the frame will start to rip your bungee cord. Once I noticed what was happening I cut some strips of fabric and wrapped and tied it around the cracks in the metal frame where the pieces of metal met. This has given the bungee cord a smooth surface and slowed the friction and ripping of the cord. Wish I would have done this from the start.

I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?


Don't overwork yourself here. You are in for the long haul. Especially if you are using your rebounder trampoline as a replacement for cardiovascular exercise. Do small jumps and set yourself at a pace which you feel comfortable with. Your breathing should become more rapid, but not a level in which you are uncomfortable. Even if this means that you hop without your feet leaving the surface of the rebounder mat.
Trampoline Net/Trampoline Enclosure: The trampoline net can become damaged in high winds if garden debris is blown into it or maybe the trampoline has been blown over and the safety enclosure got damaged in the process. The net can also be damaged by children gabbing it while they are jumping and pulling it down.
I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!
Falls from the trampoline: Think safety netting solves this problem? Think again. It does not seem to have a significant effect on the rate of this kind of injury. There isn't enough research available to explain why, but it may be because safety enclosures aren't installed correctly, because kids climb on the netting, and/or because the enclosures can wear out quickly. Warranties for enclosure nets (and padding; see below) are usually shorter than warranties for other parts of the trampoline.
With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.

Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.


While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
Some of the problems listed above may not occur with your own purchase of a Stamina 36 inch folding trampoline. You may find that you are able to purchase one and use it for many years. But don't let the negative aspects of owning a trampoline keep you from buying one for yourself: the truth is, trampoline (rebounding) use makes your lymph nodes drain, and it also is much better exercise for your body than running, which, as aforementioned, can cause great strain to the joints. And, if you're looking for a good way to lose weight, a trampoline is a good investment. So, to buy this one or not? That's up to you to decide. Read more here >>
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.

To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."

"This is something kids really like," Gaines said. "It's fun and it's something you can do in your backyard. It doesn't have a motor attached. And all of that give parents a false sense of security, especially when you add in safety devices like nets. But this statement is highlighting the fact that there are no data showing that they make it any safer."
Trampolines can move around while in use so tie the trampoline down. You can use a tether kit for this.
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
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