Where Can I Buy A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Plant City FL


The trampoline was designed as a piece of specialized training equipment for specific sports. Pediatricians should only endorse use of trampolines as part of a structured training program with appropriate coaching, supervision, and safety measures in place. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, the following apply to trampolines used in the training setting:
"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."

Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.


To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."

Because of the vast array of products that might contain one of the chemicals or ingredients on the list, we must include Proposition 65 warnings in our communications with you. We are required to use exact wording as specified by the state of California. While the warning sounds alarming, the purpose is to notify you of the potential risk so that you can make an informed buying decision.
A trampoline can provide huge health benefits for the whole family and hours of fun. They have become more popular in recent years, but with their increased popularity there has come about an increased number of accidents through their use.

Because of the vast array of products that might contain one of the chemicals or ingredients on the list, we must include Proposition 65 warnings in our communications with you. We are required to use exact wording as specified by the state of California. While the warning sounds alarming, the purpose is to notify you of the potential risk so that you can make an informed buying decision.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
In this instance, if high winds are forecast, it might be wise to secure the trampoline cover with some rope or strong twine as most covers are not designed for severe weather conditions.

The thick plastic feet make sure it stays in firmly in place. The foldable design of this mini trampoline helps you store them away in a small trunk or closet when not in use. Its mini size makes it super adjustable to your living space settings as well. It is made from durable PVC material, finished-off in a red, black and blue design scheme. It is perfect for children 3 years and above and needs adult assembly. Now you will love seeing your young one bounce off that unlimited energy and make sure they do it safely with this Little Tikes Trampoline. Happy Hop Hop Hurray!
Every growing child needs at least one hour of exercise each day, but as much as 75 percent don't get the level of activity they need. They exercise even less as they age. Did you know that 90 percent of high school kids don't exercise enough to meet health requirements? As an adult, you need to stay moving, too — for about 30 minutes each day — even though it can be difficult to squeeze in that time when you're balancing the hectic needs of a household, family and work life.
It's been damn near a year (11 months) with our trampoline, and here's how it worked out. After hours everyday of my four year old and my husband (seperately!) jumping on this, a few of the stretchy bands underneath tore/ripped off completely. No one was hurt when our trampoline broke🤗 Thankfully it didn't violently snap in half or anything. So with my boys very upset. I immediately reordered this! We also had bought a toddler trampoline last year and it broke in pieces after two months. This trampoline held up a long time after heavy use!
First off, this EXERCISE trampoline is NOT meant for children. There's even an important notice paper that comes with it stating that this is not meant for children. This is an exercise trampoline for ADULTS. Also, you can register your product as soon as you get it which means you can get replacements if something breaks without having to pay for another one.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.
Trampoline Cover. In future, a good tip is to remove the spring padding at the end of the season to protect it from the elements. Alternatively buy a trampoline cover to give added protection to the whole trampoline. The trampoline cover will help protect the bounce mat, springs, spring padding and to some extent the frame also by preventing rain water getting inside the tubing. Some people collapse the safety enclosure on to the centre of the trampoline at the end of the Autumn and cover the whole thing with the trampoline cover.
The mat is adequate in quality and the overall springiness is great for most types of exercise. Overall, we were impressed at the build quality of this trampoline for the price. It is definitely *the* best-buy rebounder that doesn't outright suck. You aren't getting any extras or special features, such as handle bars. But you do get a quality product that's excellent for beginners who don't want to invest too much.
Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.

The particulars on this are pretty standard. All-steel frame construction with six detachable legs on a 36-inch diameter frame. It's pretty small, but large enough that one or the other of use can fit onto it and use it. It will also sit well in the living room without having to shift the coffee table around too much (have I mentioned how much I hate having to move things frequently?). Trampoline safety
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