How Can I Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Cheapest In Daytona Beach FL


Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.
The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
Of course we went over all of the common excuses that grownups use to justify the purchase of a trampoline: it's good for our health, it keeps the lymphatic system working properly, it'll make our regular workouts more effective. And sure, all of that is true, but I think my wife and I both knew that we were going to make this investment because it was fun.
Note: Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitations may not apply to you. Some states do not allow the exclusion on limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.

The trampoline was designed as a piece of specialized training equipment for specific sports. Pediatricians should only endorse use of trampolines as part of a structured training program with appropriate coaching, supervision, and safety measures in place. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, the following apply to trampolines used in the training setting:


Approximately 20% of trampoline injuries have been attributable to direct contact with the springs and frame. However, similar to concerns regarding enclosure use, current literature on the effects of padding use on injury is sparse. Available data suggest that the availability and use of padding does not seem to correlate with decreased rates of injury.8,10 Rapid deterioration of padding has been cited as 1 potential reason for the lack of safety efficacy.8,10
Never let more than one child use the trampoline at the same time. Statistics show that accidents are much more likely when two or more persons are using the trampoline at the same time with the lightest person most likely to be injured.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Springless or springfree trampolines use reinforced fibreglass rods or elastic rather then springs. These trampoline are often promoted as safer then trampolines with springs. However because of their design the entire surface rotates each time the user hits the mat. This can cause pain and discomfort and even result in long term damage to the knees over time. Also many of the cheap models create an inferior bounce compared to the spring trampolines.

A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
It's been damn near a year (11 months) with our trampoline, and here's how it worked out. After hours everyday of my four year old and my husband (seperately!) jumping on this, a few of the stretchy bands underneath tore/ripped off completely. No one was hurt when our trampoline broke. Thankfully it didn't violently snap in half or anything. So with my boys very upset. I immediately reordered this! We also had bought a toddler trampoline last year and it broke in pieces after two months. This trampoline held up a long time after heavy use! Trampoline
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