Shop For Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Whitfield FL


The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12


The thick plastic feet make sure it stays in firmly in place. The foldable design of this mini trampoline helps you store them away in a small trunk or closet when not in use. Its mini size makes it super adjustable to your living space settings as well. It is made from durable PVC material, finished-off in a red, black and blue design scheme. It is perfect for children 3 years and above and needs adult assembly. Now you will love seeing your young one bounce off that unlimited energy and make sure they do it safely with this Little Tikes Trampoline. Happy Hop Hop Hurray!

There are many benefits of using a rebounder mini trampoline, and the compact size makes it so easy to store and carry anywhere you want. There are also a handful of exercises you can do on a mini trampoline, and they are not difficult to learn, so everyone in your household can participate. Read more to find out about the Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline, so you can make an informed trampoline decision. Check latest price here.


Children DO need to be taught basic safety skills--like not intentionally rocking the trampoline or going over the handle by not jumling properly and putting too much weight on the handle as opposed to just using it for balance when needed. Most children understand the common sense of this, however, and we find they opt to bounce without holding the handle at all once they are a little more skilled.
Do either 1) small jumps where you barely leave the rebounder or 2) small movements where you don't leave the rebounder at all. You want your breathing to get faster and you want to break a sweat, but you don't want to be struggling to complete 10-15 minutes on your rebounder. To learn more about rebounding exercise, you can check out our blog post here.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
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We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7-foot, enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Kids will have a ton of bouncing fun with this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline, parents will love the easy folding feature for storing. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too! The simple folding design makes this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline is easy to move around the yard. When the jumping is done fold it up and move to where ever you want to store it.

After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.


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Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
We've had this trampoline for about 7 months now and after 6 months of use the bungee cord, that holds the net in place, broke due to normal use with children in the weight range that the trampoline specifies it's for. When we took the bungee cord off, it was quite worn in the places that it was wrapped around the trampoline frame so it was inevitable that it would snap. I did contact Galt and they replaced the bungee cord at no cost to me. I expect that it will probably break again down the line.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
The evolving pattern of trampoline use and injury resulted in a series of published policy statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 1977, 1981, and 1999.1–3 The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons issued trampoline safety position statements in 2005 and 2010.4 The Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine issued a joint statement on trampoline use in 2007.5 These statements all discouraged recreational and playground use of trampolines and urged caution with and further study of trampoline use in supervised training and physical education settings.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012

A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.

To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."


Using these exercise trampolines has also been found to improve your lymphatic system.  The main job of the lymphatic system is to filter your blood and to remove accumulated toxins and heavy metals.  Your lymphatic system does not have a pump like your heart to move the lymphatic fluid around your body.  When your muscles contract, this pushes the lymphatic fluid around your body through a series of one way valves.   When jumping on the rebounder the change in gravitational forces allows the lymphatic fluid to be pumped around your body.  This then helps to remove toxins and heavy metals from your body.
The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  
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