Where To Find Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Cheapest In Blountstown FL


This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.
The Stamina 36 inch Trampoline stands on 6 legs. These legs are made of steel, hence rust resistant. They provide a strong structure to the frame. These legs are rubber-tipped so they do provide a stable structure to the trampoline. These legs are detachable as well, so you can keep de-assemble the structure is ever needed. Hence, stability and support are sure to be imparted in this product.

Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously.


Trampolines can move around while in use so tie the trampoline down. You can use a tether kit for this.
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
If the trampoline has a welded frame check the condition of the welds carefully to ensure there is no fracture. This is a common area for the trampoline to fail, perhaps from overloading or just from a poor quality weld.
To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."

If some of the trampoline enclosure poles, top caps or sleeves are missing, or damaged, then these can easily be replaced too rather than buying a whole new trampoline enclosure kit.
Trampolines can move around while in use so tie the trampoline down. You can use a tether kit for this.
Lay out a set of ground rules for what they can do on the trampoline. For example, make sure no toys are on the trampoline when jumping, and limit the number of people who can be on it at a time. This will help to ensure the weight limit isn't exceeded as well as reduce the likelihood of collisions while jumping. You can involve the kids in this step by getting them to help you come up with the list of rules. Have the kids help you make a big sign — poster, wood, whatever medium you can use — and keep it near the trampoline or posted near their other outdoor toys. Encourage all kids who play on the trampoline to be "rule enforcers" — it could help keep everyone on their best behavior and encourage them to report unsafe play immediately.
Proposition 65 requires businesses to provide Californians with a clear and reasonable warning about chemicals in the products they purchase, in their home or workplace, or that are released into the environment. By providing this information, Proposition 65 enables Californians to make informed decisions about protecting themselves from exposure to these chemicals. Proposition 65 also prohibits California businesses from knowingly discharging significant amounts of listed chemicals into sources of drinking water.
This Stamina product is meant for rebounding. Rebounding training is very beneficial to the body. It builds a cardiovascular workout by adding weights to hands and ankles. It stimulates the oxygen flow of the body and stimulates metabolism. For at home exercise, this product is extremely cheap and comfortable to use. So, now you do not need to make rounds to the gym.
There are some rebounders which are designed to bounce a lot and some which don't. If you want to use a rebounder to boost your lymphatic system, it is important that you get one with plenty of bounce so that you can generate plenty of gravitational forces. If you solely want it for cardio, the level of bounce will have little effect on how high your heart rate goes up if you stay on the rebounder long enough.

Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump. I do have a past injury to my knee (torn meniscus) so I've always been hesitant to do too much high impact activity. I have found jumping to be easy and I haven't had one problem with my knee yet.
Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.
Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.
Netting and other perimeter enclosures to prevent falls from the trampoline were first commercially available in 1997, and the American Society for Testing and Materials produced a safety standard for enclosures in 2003. There is a paucity of literature on the effects of netting and other safety measures on injury risk. However, current evidence suggests that the availability of enclosures on the market has not significantly affected the proportions of injuries attributable to falls off the trampoline,10 and there does not appear to be an inverse correlation between presence of safety equipment and rates of injury.8 Proposed reasons for lack of efficacy of safety enclosures include positioning of enclosures on the outside of the frame8 and inappropriate installation and maintenance.10 Children are often tempted to climb or grasp the netting, which may be an additional source of injury.
The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
- The metal connections of the frame will start to rip your bungee cord. Once I noticed what was happening I cut some strips of fabric and wrapped and tied it around the cracks in the metal frame where the pieces of metal met. This has given the bungee cord a smooth surface and slowed the friction and ripping of the cord. Wish I would have done this from the start.

The key feature of this trampoline is that it is made up of polypropylene and it has an adjustable safety bar that offers complete comfort to the user. The frame is made up of high-quality steel and the bouncer mat used remains durable for a long time. The bouncer mat is connected to the frame with the help of 32 metal springs. The stability bar has three adjustable heights and it can be folded and ported very easily.
Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.

UPDATE: 15 days of using this just to get my blood pumping because I do so much work on the computer, and I am pleasantly surprised to find that I have lost a little over 2 pounds! I usually use it for 10 minutes at a time, at least 3 times per day (just before mealtime, usually). I've also notice that my cardio fitness has improved. I don't wear myself out on the trampoline - I just put some Motown music on and bounce to the beat - it doesn't seem like much effort, but apparently, it's enough for overall health improvements in a very short time.
To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."

Remember when you remove the old bounce mat to take off the springs in even stages around the edge so as to maintain the tension across the bounce mat evenly until you only have four springs left attaching it at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock, then finally remove these. When installing the new mat start by putting these four springs on first and then build up the tension by gradually putting springs on to split the gaps. You will find this makes it much easier when you come to the final ones.


In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.

So far, it doesn't seem to be showing many signs of wear and tear. The padded frame mat looks a little shoddy now, which is disappointing after such a short period of time, but on an up note it's easier to put on. I would like to think that's because I've gotten stronger in the intervening time, but really it's more likely that the elastic portions are getting stretched out from repeated use. For the moment, it still does its job of giving a little bit of cushion to the frame itself, though without metal springs to protect me from it seems a bit extraneous.


Proposition 65 requires businesses to provide Californians with a clear and reasonable warning about chemicals in the products they purchase, in their home or workplace, or that are released into the environment. By providing this information, Proposition 65 enables Californians to make informed decisions about protecting themselves from exposure to these chemicals. Proposition 65 also prohibits California businesses from knowingly discharging significant amounts of listed chemicals into sources of drinking water.
So I did some digging. Turns out it's really hard to quantify the risk trampolines pose—I'll explain why in a bit—yet most pediatricians and orthopedists agree: Trampolines are a terrible idea for young kids and not so great for older ones, either. I was pretty shocked to learn that, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, children under 6 should never jump on trampolines. The American Academy of Pediatrics is even more conservative: It "strongly discourages" recreational trampoline use at all ages.
"This is something kids really like," Gaines said. "It's fun and it's something you can do in your backyard. It doesn't have a motor attached. And all of that give parents a false sense of security, especially when you add in safety devices like nets. But this statement is highlighting the fact that there are no data showing that they make it any safer."
Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.
Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
The best trampolines come with performance and safety testings and guarantees. Before you buy it, make sure your trampoline has been tested and look into its additional features. Is it UV-resistant and strong enough to withstand weather conditions? In addition to following all our other tips for trampoline safety, investing in a trampoline of the highest quality is the best way to start your jumping experience safely.
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