Where To Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Hampton FL


Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.
"This is something kids really like," Gaines said. "It's fun and it's something you can do in your backyard. It doesn't have a motor attached. And all of that give parents a false sense of security, especially when you add in safety devices like nets. But this statement is highlighting the fact that there are no data showing that they make it any safer."
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.

The inventor of the Trampoline Safety Net that protects millions of happy kids around the world, Mark Publicover, created TrampolineSafety.com to encourage the companies using his many trampoline inventions to build longer lasting safety components. JumpSport, the family owned business founded by Mark in 1997, sponsors and owns this website. We are completely transparent about how we gather over 40 data points and measurements. All testing is conducted by JumpSport using its state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?

Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!
If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.
Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
What I found interesting was that instead of metal springs like you would find in most trampolines, this one uses thirty two-inch wide tension bands placed around the frame. This is probably to help it fold more easily, but I liked the idea that it would have fewer metal parts in general since those can be sharp and if I'm going to be playing with the frame frequently, I'd rather avoid things that could cut or scratch me.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this. Orthopedic injuries associated with backyard trampoline use in children
×