Where Can I Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Best Price In Frostproof FL


But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.

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Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt.
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in their online article Physical Activity and the Health of Young People, states that "children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease." (For full text and references please click here)
Bought this for my wife 10 months ago. She uses it 3-4 times per week and the Trampoline is stretched and wore out. Description says that it rated for 250 lbs no way this is true. My wife is around 150 lbs and look at the attached pictures of how it held up to a person around 150 lbs. Recommend not purchasing this item unless you want to buy a new one every year.

In general, the more expensive the rebounder is, the better it is, but to choose the best rebounder for you, you need to look at rebounder reviews. Scroll up and click on one of the links to read the reviews for that particular model, and if one looks good, make the purchase! (Even if you hate rebounding, Amazon offers a no-questions-asked return policy.)
This trampoline has an easy set up, and though it's said that you might need two people to set it up, if there's just one of you, you can use your body weight to unfold it on your own. This trampoline also bounces really well, and it's neither overly stiff nor overly flexible, so you can make it work just perfectly. There is a chance that, if you jump, you will improve your posture over time. You may also notice that if you jump, your lymph nodes will drain, and you will feel that the trampoline is a good health investment.
This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.

Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
- The handle of the trampoline does NOT fold down. The legs are really easy to fold, but the handle you have to unscrew. Mine is a tight fit and not easy to get back on as easily. Not the quick storage I thought it would be but to be honest, the kids are not happy when it gets put away so I have not really stored it for breaks like I thought I would anyway.
Do either 1) small jumps where you barely leave the rebounder or 2) small movements where you don't leave the rebounder at all. You want your breathing to get faster and you want to break a sweat, but you don't want to be struggling to complete 10-15 minutes on your rebounder. To learn more about rebounding exercise, you can check out our blog post here.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
I was worried that the resistance bands wouldn't be as springy as metal springs would be, but I was wrong. The mat feels stable and responds well to bounces. Both of us are well under the weight limit of 250 pounds, so we tried some more extreme bounces to see if they would affect performance. In the end, that initial trial had us jumping up and down like kids, lifting our legs, slamming them into the mat when we came down, and pretty much stress testing it as much as possible while we did.

Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012

"Unfortunately, injuries happen for the same reasons trampolines are fun," says Lori DeBold, M.D., vice chair of pediatrics at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, in Fountain Valley, California. "A child has some, but not total, control over how high she bounces and where she lands." Nearly two-thirds of trampoline accidents are caused by children jumping at the same time and crashing into one another. If you believe that the benefits of a backyard trampoline outweigh the risks, follow these rules from the safety experts.

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