Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In South Bay FL


Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself. Trampolines: A safe, fun activity for your kids?
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24

For starters, don't get a rebounder if you want to have fun. Rebounder trampolines aren't for recreational jumping. In fact, you will get bored with a rebounder trampoline pretty quickly even if you expect it to be fun. However, it is a wonderful exercise tool if you would rather jump on a trampoline then practice another form of cardiovascular exercise such as running or biking, then a rebounder trampoline is perfect for your needs.

The information listed above was obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Nationwide, its affiliates and employees do not guarantee improved results based upon the information contained herein and assume no liability in connection with the information or the provided safety suggestions. The recommendations provided are general in nature; unique circumstances may not warrant or require implementation of some or all of the safety suggestions. There may be additional available safety procedures that are not referenced on this webpage.


Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10

Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt.


"Kids get hurt on trampolines", he says, "for one of two reasons, I think. There's obviously different exceptions. One is just more than one person on a trampoline. That's the number one rule that we teach. The other type of injury, I feel, is kids doing things that are above their skill level. Their friend can do a flip so they're going to try one without knowing the progressions. And I believe that's when they get hurt."
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."
Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.

The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up. Trampoline Park Safety Standards Act
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