Where Can You Buy A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Fruitville FL


Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.
The special feature of the urban rebounder trampoline is the two different sizes of hinge legs. These legs offer a versatile workout to the user. The frames in this trampoline are made up of solid metal with corrosion resistant technology. The bouncer mat is made up of highly durable mesh material. This trampoline folds easily and it occupies very small space for storage. The jumping surface is very soft and it is connected to the mat with the help of the springs. The weight bearing capacity of this trampoline is about 300 pounds and suits the best for adults and kids.

Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.

When you use a rebounder trampoline you will constantly be practicing your balance and building the muscles which help keep you on your feet. As you get older, the threat that a fall can have on your body becomes increasingly more dangerous. Nobody likes to hear that a loved one has broken a bone because they fell down. Especially when it is one of our elderly loved ones. The older you get, the more fragile your muscles get. Save your friends and family the heartbreak and keep up with your balancing muscles so that we never have to receive that call.


Type of bounce: Some rebounders will give you a lot of bounce, and others will give you barely any at all. Don't be tricked into thinking that the more bounce, the better the rebounder is. It really depends on what you're using the rebounder for - if it's mainly for cardio, then get a lot of bounce; if it's mainly for lymphatic system "cleanup", get one with not a lot of bounce. The latter will be easier to do and you won't get as tired.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
The Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe and progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, weight loss, and circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Improve your fitness with the Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline.

However, remember that to lose weight you always need to consume fewer calories than you consume. To lose one pound of fat you will need to burn 3500 more calories than you consume. This means that every 8.1 hours you spend on a rebounder trampoline, you can expect to lose one pound. Of course, you need to remember to watch your calorie intake otherwise you are just jumping to help maintain your weight.
I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!
This Stamina product is meant for rebounding. Rebounding training is very beneficial to the body. It builds a cardiovascular workout by adding weights to hands and ankles. It stimulates the oxygen flow of the body and stimulates metabolism. For at home exercise, this product is extremely cheap and comfortable to use. So, now you do not need to make rounds to the gym.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
Products listed as Out of Stock are currently not in stock at the store(s) being viewed. Note that in some instances, very limited inventory may be available in stores, but because of small quantities we are unable to reflect the availability online. Please remember to check back – if or when inventory is replenished and available, this will be reflected online.
We've all heard about trampolines. Especially from kids who tell stories about going to their friend's house and how fun it was to play games on their friend's trampoline. Did you know that trampolines aren't only good for recreational activity? Rebounder trampolines are a great way to get all of the exercise benefits of a normal trampoline without sacrificing too much space on your property.

Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."


If the trampoline has a welded frame check the condition of the welds carefully to ensure there is no fracture. This is a common area for the trampoline to fail, perhaps from overloading or just from a poor quality weld.
What I found interesting was that instead of metal springs like you would find in most trampolines, this one uses thirty two-inch wide tension bands placed around the frame. This is probably to help it fold more easily, but I liked the idea that it would have fewer metal parts in general since those can be sharp and if I'm going to be playing with the frame frequently, I'd rather avoid things that could cut or scratch me.
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this.
Products listed as Out of Stock are currently not in stock at the store(s) being viewed. Note that in some instances, very limited inventory may be available in stores, but because of small quantities we are unable to reflect the availability online. Please remember to check back – if or when inventory is replenished and available, this will be reflected online.

Among the most common injuries in all age groups, include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 37 to 39 percent of all injuries and can be potentially catastrophic, the authors reported. Especially frightening was one study cited by LaBotz and her colleagues that found that 1 in 200 trampoline injuries resulted in some sort of permanent neurologic damage.
My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it.

What a great way to get a low impact workout! The only flaw with this model is that it is difficult to pop it open and then reclose it for storage. It takes 2 people! You have to use a lot of force to pop it open or get it folded up. I guess that's a safety feature. If it weren't for the difficulty in folding it, I would have given it 5 stars. This rebounder is very sturdy though and is just right for my small workout area.
Falls from the trampoline: Think safety netting solves this problem? Think again. It does not seem to have a significant effect on the rate of this kind of injury. There isn't enough research available to explain why, but it may be because safety enclosures aren't installed correctly, because kids climb on the netting, and/or because the enclosures can wear out quickly. Warranties for enclosure nets (and padding; see below) are usually shorter than warranties for other parts of the trampoline.

In fact, they're the main reason I went to such lengths to put this through its paces. While I can't speak for the future, so far there don't seem to be any problems with mine and this was the time when most of the negative reviews said things started to go wrong. I certainly don't doubt the people who had those experiences, but considering the number of reviews mentioning this, it might have been a defect with those particular items rather than a more widespread problem.
Type of bounce: Some rebounders will give you a lot of bounce, and others will give you barely any at all. Don't be tricked into thinking that the more bounce, the better the rebounder is. It really depends on what you're using the rebounder for - if it's mainly for cardio, then get a lot of bounce; if it's mainly for lymphatic system "cleanup", get one with not a lot of bounce. The latter will be easier to do and you won't get as tired.

While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.
My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.
Of course we went over all of the common excuses that grownups use to justify the purchase of a trampoline: it's good for our health, it keeps the lymphatic system working properly, it'll make our regular workouts more effective. And sure, all of that is true, but I think my wife and I both knew that we were going to make this investment because it was fun.

Destini had been showing her mom gymnastics moves she'd been practicing when the accident happened. Like many parents, Prouty had assumed that as long as her daughter followed general safety rules such as only one child on the trampoline at a time, Destini would be fine. But even when safety precautions are taken, trampolines can still be dangerous, said Dr. Michele LaBotz, a lead author of the new AAP statement and a sports medicine physician at Intermed Sports Medicine in Portland, Me.

Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 
×