How Can I Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Best Price In Frostproof FL


Children DO need to be taught basic safety skills--like not intentionally rocking the trampoline or going over the handle by not jumling properly and putting too much weight on the handle as opposed to just using it for balance when needed. Most children understand the common sense of this, however, and we find they opt to bounce without holding the handle at all once they are a little more skilled.
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7-foot, enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Kids will have a ton of bouncing fun with this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline, parents will love the easy folding feature for storing. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too! The simple folding design makes this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline is easy to move around the yard. When the jumping is done fold it up and move to where ever you want to store it.
Many cheap trampolines use a PE material which will probably require replacing annually as the material tends to crack in the sunlight. Spending a little more on better quality spring padding can save money in the long run.
If some of the trampoline enclosure poles, top caps or sleeves are missing, or damaged, then these can easily be replaced too rather than buying a whole new trampoline enclosure kit.
George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.

Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.

"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.


ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
At jumpstreet® your safety is our Number One Priority! Through years of research we have developed our patented trampoline system for your enjoyment. We are one of the lead indoor trampoline park companies involved in putting the ASTM safety standards into place and we are a founding member and on the board of directors for the International Association of Indoor Trampoline Parks. Please see below for our very important rules that will assist in keeping you safe and having FUN!
For starters, don't get a rebounder if you want to have fun. Rebounder trampolines aren't for recreational jumping. In fact, you will get bored with a rebounder trampoline pretty quickly even if you expect it to be fun. However, it is a wonderful exercise tool if you would rather jump on a trampoline then practice another form of cardiovascular exercise such as running or biking, then a rebounder trampoline is perfect for your needs.
Parents: At JumpSport, we prod, measure, stretch, slam into, test, bounce on, and review 40+ criteria to make sure show that we live up to our mission of keeping your family safe. Based on our 20 years of leadership in the industry, and with over 17 patents and pioneering safety innovations, we know that safety is only good if it lasts. Typical, low-priced trampolines, and even some high-priced modes, quickly become unsafe and actually cost more per year to maintain safe use or to replace compared with JumpSport and AlleyOOP trampolines.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.
The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
I can actually say this is the first time in years I've really enjoyed exercising. I can do it anytime I want. Instead of sitting, I do exercises instead. Instead of taking a nap, I do some runs instead. And the best part, I know this is better for me & helps me get back in shape. Have already lost some pounds without even feeling like I'm depriving myself or on a diet. Just do this & watch what I eat. No more extra time for snacking.
Several cases of vertebral artery dissection presenting 12 to 24 hours after a neck injury on the trampoline have been reported. Vertebral artery dissections are the result of abrupt cervical hyperextension and rotation. Trauma to the artery may result in an intramural thrombus, which can cause a subsequent dissection of the vessel and possible intracranial emboli. These are often devastating injuries and may produce lasting neurologic complications.25,26 Any neck pain associated with trampoline use requires prompt medical evaluation and diagnostic assessment.
- The handle of the trampoline does NOT fold down. The legs are really easy to fold, but the handle you have to unscrew. Mine is a tight fit and not easy to get back on as easily. Not the quick storage I thought it would be but to be honest, the kids are not happy when it gets put away so I have not really stored it for breaks like I thought I would anyway.
The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.

Note: Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitations may not apply to you. Some states do not allow the exclusion on limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.
The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
Encourage them to bounce in the centre of the trampoline and keep other children back away from the trampoline. Never let them go underneath a trampoline.
One major aspect not mentioned is age. The older the child the more "firm" their bones are. My middle child was a young walker and excellent in gross motor skills. We had a smaller trampoline that we let her jump on since 12mo. At 20mo she just landed wrong and broke her femur. Nothing else to stop that from happening other than her age. We sold that trampoline so fast. Won't be buying another one ever and won't go to trampoline parks either. Not worth the pain and financial strain, not to mention the emotional toll it takes on the child.
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