Purchase Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Zolfo Springs FL


"Unfortunately, injuries happen for the same reasons trampolines are fun," says Lori DeBold, M.D., vice chair of pediatrics at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, in Fountain Valley, California. "A child has some, but not total, control over how high she bounces and where she lands." Nearly two-thirds of trampoline accidents are caused by children jumping at the same time and crashing into one another. If you believe that the benefits of a backyard trampoline outweigh the risks, follow these rules from the safety experts.

My 12 year old daughter goes through mini trampolines a few times a year because she uses it regularly for sensory stimulation. This particular one has lasted the longest( usually 3-4 months) rather than the Gold's Gym mini trampoline (lasted 1 month). The most problematic part of assembly of the Stamina is the need for two people to safely unfold it, however, it is still quite easy to assemble after this step-just screw on the legs and go!

Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.


Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.

To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."

Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.


Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.

A fantastic way to prevent injuries and keep your kids safe on a trampoline is to install or maintain a strong safety net that protects both the jumper and the springs of the trampoline. Many trampoline models come with safety nets built into the design, and if not, you can purchase an enclosure net as an additional accessory and install it according to the size of your trampoline. 


~ In 1996 we invented what is widely recognized as the most important trampoline safety innovation ever; the trampoline safety net. It's protected millions of kids around the world – maybe even yours. Today, 17 safety patents later, we continue to lead the industry making trampolines engineered to our exacting safety and quality standards, and built to last.
Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."

Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 


Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

First, it's probably a good idea to lower the enclosure poles of your trampoline, as the enclosure net acts as a sail and can pick up your trampoline with a good wind storm. It's also a good idea to invest in steel wind stakes, which will help anchor your trampoline to the ground. And last of all, please don't just stand by your trampoline when a storm is approaching. We don't know why you would… but better not.
Trampoline safety recommendations have consistently advised adult supervision when children are on the trampoline. However, multiple studies reveal that approximately one-third to one-half of injuries8,12,17–19 occurred despite reported adult supervision. These authors have raised concerns regarding supervision complacency, particularly when safety measures are in place, as well as lack of adult knowledge and intervention regarding risk behavior with trampoline use.
In fact, they're the main reason I went to such lengths to put this through its paces. While I can't speak for the future, so far there don't seem to be any problems with mine and this was the time when most of the negative reviews said things started to go wrong. I certainly don't doubt the people who had those experiences, but considering the number of reviews mentioning this, it might have been a defect with those particular items rather than a more widespread problem.

We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7-foot, enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Kids will have a ton of bouncing fun with this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline, parents will love the easy folding feature for storing. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too! The simple folding design makes this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline is easy to move around the yard. When the jumping is done fold it up and move to where ever you want to store it.

The steel frame and its six legs, with rubberized bottom caps for added stability, can hold 250 lbs easily. That's more than enough for most people. The assembly in general is pain-free with legible instructions (a rarity in this price range). It will take you up to two hours; the package has 20 parts you have to assemble. You also get a few workout tips but it's nothing serious.
The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12

Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.
The Stamina 36-Inch Folding Trampoline provides the supportive bounce you need to get the job done. The heavy-duty rebounding surface supports users up to 250 pounds. Thirty tension bands assure a stable and gentle motion with each bounce. This trampoline is also outfitted with a border safety skirt to protect the feet and fingers from injury while jumping.
"Unfortunately, injuries happen for the same reasons trampolines are fun," says Lori DeBold, M.D., vice chair of pediatrics at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, in Fountain Valley, California. "A child has some, but not total, control over how high she bounces and where she lands." Nearly two-thirds of trampoline accidents are caused by children jumping at the same time and crashing into one another. If you believe that the benefits of a backyard trampoline outweigh the risks, follow these rules from the safety experts.
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