Where Can I Buy A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Cheapest In Sea Ranch Lakes Village FL


Before you or the kids get on the trampoline to jump, always make sure there's nothing beneath the mat. Little ones may look at the under-area as a place to play and store toys, but objects below the trampoline can pose a serious risk if your kids land on them through the mat while jumping. Make sure no ladders, tools, toys or chairs are resting beneath the mat — and make sure no one is playing there, either! Keep other family members and pets away from the area surrounding the trampoline when someone is bouncing. Your trampoline surface itself should be completely clear of toys, pets and other objects before jumping time. 

Trampolines can move around while in use so tie the trampoline down. You can use a tether kit for this.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
Another area of concern included reports of decreased quality of recreational trampoline equipment sold over the past several decades. According to the International Trampoline Industry Association, trampolines sold in 1989 had an expected life of 10 years; the expectation for trampolines sold in 2004 was only 5 years.10 Warranty coverage has also decreased since 2004, but the warranty for the frame and mat is consistently found to be greater than for the padding and enclosure nets. This reflects the manufacturers' expectation that the padding and enclosure net will need replacement during the lifetime of the trampoline.10
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.
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Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
I have used a rebounder in Hawaii for over 20 years, bought another one in Australia and got another one this last month...Locally I have carried it with me in the car and on planes.It is far better impact on my feet/ ankles/legs than pounding on concrete surfaces. Found a great book with many many specific exercises, made a chart of them and laminated it so it can go with me too.30 minutes of simply jogging have been an excellent 'wake up' exercise for me in the AM and a gentle 'slow down' at night.
- The handle of the trampoline does NOT fold down. The legs are really easy to fold, but the handle you have to unscrew. Mine is a tight fit and not easy to get back on as easily. Not the quick storage I thought it would be but to be honest, the kids are not happy when it gets put away so I have not really stored it for breaks like I thought I would anyway.

Interestingly, gravitational pulls boost the lymphatic system at a much higher level than many other cardiovascular exercises since, after all, you are jumping up and down. You would be hard-pressed to find another exercise mechanism than using a rebounder for lymph drainage. If you want to boost your immune system and lymphatic system at an optimum level, then start using a rebounder for lymph drainage.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
This is the most important area for checking as a frame could fail whilst in use leading to a possible serious injury for anyone who is using it at the time.
Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."
Make sure the net you choose is compatible with your trampoline and properly attached to the springs and frame. Don't use hand-me-down nets from friends' trampolines or purchase from non-affiliated websites to save money — to keep your trampoline as safe and sturdy as possible, choose a net made by the same manufacturer as your trampoline model. Follow safety manual instructions for installation. When you do have your safety net all set up, make sure it doesn't extend over the edge and under the jumping mat — blocking visibility under the mat could lead to dangerous conditions like toys or debris being left below the trampoline. 
Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.
When I read the reviews, I was very hesitant to buy it because so many people were saying that it was tearing and people's feet could touch the ground when they jumped on it. I've had mine for 2 weeks and it does great with me exercising (bouncing not jumping) on it every day for 30-60 minutes. I've had people that weighed 200lbs exercise on it and it kept its shape and never tore. I love this little exercise trampoline, it helped me lose 10lbs. I don't fold mine up, I keep it open and out so that I can get on whenever I want to get a little exercise in. I do think that 2 people are needed to assemble it because it can be a little difficult to open it or put the cover on because it's very tight. This trampoline was well worth the money and for something so cheap, I could see it lasting several years if you take care of it (not jumping as high as you can, jumping in the middle of the trampoline, not letting kids use it). The straps are very sturdy and provide a nice bounce when exercising.
Trampoline Storage. When not in use ensure that the trampoline is kept dry to prevent rusting and that the mat is kept away from the sun as the ultraviolet rays of the sun can corrode the mat.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data.
Don't overwork yourself here. You are in for the long haul. Especially if you are using your rebounder trampoline as a replacement for cardiovascular exercise. Do small jumps and set yourself at a pace which you feel comfortable with. Your breathing should become more rapid, but not a level in which you are uncomfortable. Even if this means that you hop without your feet leaving the surface of the rebounder mat.

In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously.
"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."

This trampoline is very easy to assemble and it can be done by a single person within 5 minutes. It is a specially designed trampoline for kids and this trampoline can bear weight about 150 pounds. The bouncer mat is made up of high-quality material and it also has a circular foam pad to enhance safety features. The disassembly of this trampoline is very easy. There is a handle that offers complete grip and support to the kid. This handle is padded for safety.


Trampoline jumping poses a high risk of injury for children. The activity can result in sprains and fractures in the arms or legs — as well as potentially serious head and neck injuries. The risk of injury is so high that the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages the use of trampolines at home. Trampoline park injuries also are an area of emerging concern.
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