Shop For Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Tavernier FL


According to the royal society for the prevention of accidents approximately 75% of injuries occur when more than one person is on the trampoline with the person weighing less five times more likely to be injured. Children of a young age are particularly vulnerable to injury. Also unless the child is supervised by a trained 'spotter', adult supervision seems to do little to prevent accidents with about half of all injuries occurring with adult supervision.

Interestingly, gravitational pulls boost the lymphatic system at a much higher level than many other cardiovascular exercises since, after all, you are jumping up and down. You would be hard-pressed to find another exercise mechanism than using a rebounder for lymph drainage. If you want to boost your immune system and lymphatic system at an optimum level, then start using a rebounder for lymph drainage.
Always supervise children and avoid allowing them to practice somersaults. These should only be performed in a properly organised club. Also exit a trampoline the proper way, not by jumping off!
My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump. I do have a past injury to my knee (torn meniscus) so I've always been hesitant to do too much high impact activity. I have found jumping to be easy and I haven't had one problem with my knee yet.
This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
We've all heard about trampolines. Especially from kids who tell stories about going to their friend's house and how fun it was to play games on their friend's trampoline. Did you know that trampolines aren't only good for recreational activity? Rebounder trampolines are a great way to get all of the exercise benefits of a normal trampoline without sacrificing too much space on your property.

Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24
With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24

ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)

There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."


Stamina Products Inc. was founded in 1987, and was one of the first companies to develop infomercial products, with the introduction of the American Gladiator Home Gym. Stamina products additionally include the popular AeroPilates Performer, InStride Walker, Body Dome, and GYROTONIC Transformer. In addition to the Stamina brand, the company's products include Body by Jake, Suzanne Somers, Tony Little, Cosmopolitan, Brenda DyGraf, Denise Austin, and BodyShaping brands.

Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.
~ In 1996 we invented what is widely recognized as the most important trampoline safety innovation ever; the trampoline safety net. It's protected millions of kids around the world – maybe even yours. Today, 17 safety patents later, we continue to lead the industry making trampolines engineered to our exacting safety and quality standards, and built to last.
We know it might be hard for your little ones to wait their turn to jump… and it certainly doesn't sound as exciting to jump solo. That's one of the reasons we've created a variety of trampoline accessories, giving the whole family an opportunity to play. Check out some add-ons that might be a game-changer for your family, including basketball hoops, a volleyball net, a double toss game, a bounce back game, a football game, and more!
At jumpstreet® your safety is our Number One Priority! Through years of research we have developed our patented trampoline system for your enjoyment. We are one of the lead indoor trampoline park companies involved in putting the ASTM safety standards into place and we are a founding member and on the board of directors for the International Association of Indoor Trampoline Parks. Please see below for our very important rules that will assist in keeping you safe and having FUN!
What I found interesting was that instead of metal springs like you would find in most trampolines, this one uses thirty two-inch wide tension bands placed around the frame. This is probably to help it fold more easily, but I liked the idea that it would have fewer metal parts in general since those can be sharp and if I'm going to be playing with the frame frequently, I'd rather avoid things that could cut or scratch me.
Netting and other perimeter enclosures to prevent falls from the trampoline were first commercially available in 1997, and the American Society for Testing and Materials produced a safety standard for enclosures in 2003. There is a paucity of literature on the effects of netting and other safety measures on injury risk. However, current evidence suggests that the availability of enclosures on the market has not significantly affected the proportions of injuries attributable to falls off the trampoline,10 and there does not appear to be an inverse correlation between presence of safety equipment and rates of injury.8 Proposed reasons for lack of efficacy of safety enclosures include positioning of enclosures on the outside of the frame8 and inappropriate installation and maintenance.10 Children are often tempted to climb or grasp the netting, which may be an additional source of injury.
What I mean by that is that the pad doesn't have a whole lot of padding. I suppose it couldn't and still be as portable, but after a while I started to wonder why I even bothered to struggle putting it on at all. If I land on the frame while bouncing, not only am I going to have more to worry about since that will likely flip the trampoline and send me flying to the ground, but I don't imagine it will do much to protect my foot from bruising. Sometimes when I don't feel like fighting with it, I don't even bother putting on the pad and it still works fine.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself.
Parents: At JumpSport, we prod, measure, stretch, slam into, test, bounce on, and review 40+ criteria to make sure show that we live up to our mission of keeping your family safe. Based on our 20 years of leadership in the industry, and with over 17 patents and pioneering safety innovations, we know that safety is only good if it lasts. Typical, low-priced trampolines, and even some high-priced modes, quickly become unsafe and actually cost more per year to maintain safe use or to replace compared with JumpSport and AlleyOOP trampolines.
In general, the more expensive the rebounder is, the better it is, but to choose the best rebounder for you, you need to look at rebounder reviews. Scroll up and click on one of the links to read the reviews for that particular model, and if one looks good, make the purchase! (Even if you hate rebounding, Amazon offers a no-questions-asked return policy.)
The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
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