How Can You Get Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Discount In Palm Harbor FL


However, rebounder trampolines are normally only two to four feet in diameter and only a couple feet off the ground. This means you can store them in your house and use them for exercise purposes. After all, it is a lot more fun to jump on a big trampoline than a rebounder trampoline. However, rebounder trampolines are designed for exercise, not for fun.
Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.
A trampoline can provide huge health benefits for the whole family and hours of fun. They have become more popular in recent years, but with their increased popularity there has come about an increased number of accidents through their use.
"This is something kids really like," Gaines said. "It's fun and it's something you can do in your backyard. It doesn't have a motor attached. And all of that give parents a false sense of security, especially when you add in safety devices like nets. But this statement is highlighting the fact that there are no data showing that they make it any safer."

I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.


The NEISS data showed that the youngest kids are at greatest risk for significant injury, including fractures of the legs and spine. Studies have shown that children younger than 6 years old accounted for 22 to 37 percent of all those turning up in the emergency room for evaluation. And NEISS data show that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48 percent in kids 5 years and younger.
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
The Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe and progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, weight loss, and circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Improve your fitness with the Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline.
Terrible design. Bought for Christmas. It was easy to assemble, not very bouncy, but it was okay for the first two months or so when my 90 pound daughter was the only one using it. After a few weeks with my 120 pound daughter bouncing on it for an hour or so daily, it is no longer bouncy and the bouncing surface is stretched out and distorted. No one in the house weighs more than 130. There is no way this thing should be on its last leg with less than three months of use!

One major aspect not mentioned is age. The older the child the more "firm" their bones are. My middle child was a young walker and excellent in gross motor skills. We had a smaller trampoline that we let her jump on since 12mo. At 20mo she just landed wrong and broke her femur. Nothing else to stop that from happening other than her age. We sold that trampoline so fast. Won't be buying another one ever and won't go to trampoline parks either. Not worth the pain and financial strain, not to mention the emotional toll it takes on the child.
What a great way to get a low impact workout! The only flaw with this model is that it is difficult to pop it open and then reclose it for storage. It takes 2 people! You have to use a lot of force to pop it open or get it folded up. I guess that's a safety feature. If it weren't for the difficulty in folding it, I would have given it 5 stars. This rebounder is very sturdy though and is just right for my small workout area.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.

A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data. Serious Injuries Prompt Recall of Mini-Trampolines
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