How Can You Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Best Price In Lake City FL


The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.
This one is pretty obvious… make sure there's nothing under the trampoline! The trampoline should be on a level surface, and check underneath to make sure there's no toys, pets, chickens, pet chickens, little brothers or sisters, big pointy things, boulders, etc. I think it's safe to say that the only thing that should be under your trampoline is grass. Or dirt depending on if your lawn isn't doing so hot this year.
We know it might be hard for your little ones to wait their turn to jump… and it certainly doesn't sound as exciting to jump solo. That's one of the reasons we've created a variety of trampoline accessories, giving the whole family an opportunity to play. Check out some add-ons that might be a game-changer for your family, including basketball hoops, a volleyball net, a double toss game, a bounce back game, a football game, and more!
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In children younger than 14 years, rates of swimming injuries were similar to those for trampoline.6 Once again, exposure comparisons are difficult, but home swimming pools and home trampolines do share some features in terms of injury risk. Home trampolines and home swimming pools are both considered by many insurance companies to be "attractive nuisances" capable of enticing children into potentially dangerous situations. As such, many homeowner insurance policies have trampoline exclusions or mandate that trampolines are within enclosed areas with restricted access, similar to rules for swimming pools and spas. A key difference between swimming pools and trampolines is that evidence-based safety recommendations for home swimming pools (ie, 4-sided fencing that completely isolates the pool from the house and yard) are a broadly publicized focus for many groups concerned with public safety, but trampoline safety information has not been as well studied or as widely disseminated. Many parents and supervising adults do not appear to be aware of key components of trampoline safety, such as limiting the trampoline to 1 user at a time, and this may contribute significantly to current injury rates.8

What about mini-trampolines like the one my kids use? There's no question they are safer than the big contraptions—very few injuries end up being serious—but Weiss warns that their seeming innocuousness can itself be a problem because mini-trampoline jumping tends to be poorly supervised by parents (yep, guilty), and jumpers also tend to be younger (my 3-year-old loves it). And there's no evidence either way about whether those handles make them safer. Young kids are especially at risk using trampolines of any type because their balance and body awareness is so terrible. My youngest walks into a wall at least twice a day, so why would I think she'd be fine jumping on an uneven elastic surface?


Well made, attractive and affordable product. This rebounder allows you to Jump Up and Down. This is the best way to activate your body's lymphatic system. When you jump up and down, you give your body a mini blood transfusion which helps cleanse the lymphatics and recirculate blood throughout the body. There is simply no better form of exercise on the planet for your skin, your heart, your digestion and your hair. There are other more expensive trampolines on the market. But the Stamina 36'' has a reasonable price at Walmart. I highly recommend it. :)
Of course we went over all of the common excuses that grownups use to justify the purchase of a trampoline: it's good for our health, it keeps the lymphatic system working properly, it'll make our regular workouts more effective. And sure, all of that is true, but I think my wife and I both knew that we were going to make this investment because it was fun.
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.
When you're bouncing your way to better health together, it's important to jump under the best conditions to ensure trampoline safety — so everyone can enjoy some hazard-free physical fun that will keep your kids interested in exercise. If you're wondering how to lessen trampoline injuries and keep your kids safe, SkyBound USA is here to help. Here are our top tips for trampoline safety:
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
The NEISS data showed that the youngest kids are at greatest risk for significant injury, including fractures of the legs and spine. Studies have shown that children younger than 6 years old accounted for 22 to 37 percent of all those turning up in the emergency room for evaluation. And NEISS data show that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48 percent in kids 5 years and younger.
Patterns of injury vary by patient age. In retrospective reviews, individuals younger than 6 years accounted for 22% to 37% of individuals with a trampoline-related injury presenting to emergency departments for evaluation.8,16 Although most trampoline injuries are sprains, strains, contusions, or other soft tissue injury, younger children seem to be more prone to bony injury.11,18 According to an analysis of data from the NEISS, 29% of injuries in the 6- to 17-year age group resulted in fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48% in children 5 years and younger.18 Data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program revealed higher rates of hospitalization for trampoline injuries in children younger than 4 years as compared with their older counterparts.9
To make sure your jumping surface is up for a lot of bouncy feet, you should regularly inspect it and make sure everything is in good shape. Your shock-absorbing jump surface should be well-secured and taut — but not attached too tightly. The action of repetitive jumping needs a somewhat forgiving surface to allow for smoothness and force-absorption. 
Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline. The Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe, progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, overall muscle strength, to aid in weight loss, and to improve circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Start slowly and progress at your own speed. By adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, you will progress to a more complete cardiovascular workout. You don't need an expensive gym membership to get fit. And you don't need a large workout area at home. Rebound while you watch TV, then fold and store it away in a closet or under the bed. - Rugged, all-steel frame construction 36 inch diameter - Folds for easy storage - Safety pad - Heavy-duty rebounding surface - Thirty tension band resistance, each are 2 inches wide for durability and stability - Six detachable rubber-tipped legs
The information listed above was obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Nationwide, its affiliates and employees do not guarantee improved results based upon the information contained herein and assume no liability in connection with the information or the provided safety suggestions. The recommendations provided are general in nature; unique circumstances may not warrant or require implementation of some or all of the safety suggestions. There may be additional available safety procedures that are not referenced on this webpage.
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