How To Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Solana FL


What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.

A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
In this instance, if high winds are forecast, it might be wise to secure the trampoline cover with some rope or strong twine as most covers are not designed for severe weather conditions.
Competitive trampoline programs use a rectangular trampoline that is significantly different in size, quality, and cost than a recreational trampoline. Competition-style trampolines have center mats that are 7 ft by 14 ft. They are surrounded by a rim of padding over the springs and the 10-ft by 17-ft frame. These trampolines are raised off the ground and have 6 ft of end-deck padding. They do not have enclosure netting present. Within the competition setting, these trampolines have an additional 5- to 6-ft radius of padding present on the floor. In the training setting, competitive trampolines may be either raised off the ground, or "pit" trampolines, which are located at ground level. Either a bungee system or a rope and pulley system with a harness is used as athletes master tumbling skills.
If any parts of the trampoline are damaged avoid use and purchase the correct replacements before continuing.
Using a rebounder trampoline allows you to burn 7.2 calories per minute, which is about 432 calories per hour. The average runner can expect to burn around 100 calories per mile. This means (on average) that you would need to run over 4 miles to get the same workout that you would get with an hour on a rebounder. Since many people despise running, there isn't a better reason to use a rebounder trampoline.
Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 
The action of bouncing up and down against gravity strengthens all body systems and is considered one of the most beneficial aerobic exercises ever developed. The heart itself is strengthened due to the increased heart rate. Trampolining also benefits the lymphatic system. The lymph provides nutrients to each and every cell and rids the human body of various wastes. The immune system is boosted and helps in detoxifying. Circulation is increased releasing energy and pumping oxygen into the brain.

The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump. I do have a past injury to my knee (torn meniscus) so I've always been hesitant to do too much high impact activity. I have found jumping to be easy and I haven't had one problem with my knee yet.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.
It's been damn near a year (11 months) with our trampoline, and here's how it worked out. After hours everyday of my four year old and my husband (seperately!) jumping on this, a few of the stretchy bands underneath tore/ripped off completely. No one was hurt when our trampoline broke🤗 Thankfully it didn't violently snap in half or anything. So with my boys very upset. I immediately reordered this! We also had bought a toddler trampoline last year and it broke in pieces after two months. This trampoline held up a long time after heavy use!
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
The action of bouncing up and down against gravity strengthens all body systems and is considered one of the most beneficial aerobic exercises ever developed. The heart itself is strengthened due to the increased heart rate. Trampolining also benefits the lymphatic system. The lymph provides nutrients to each and every cell and rids the human body of various wastes. The immune system is boosted and helps in detoxifying. Circulation is increased releasing energy and pumping oxygen into the brain.

My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it. Are trampolines safe for children?
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