How Can You Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Wekiwa Springs FL


To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."
This is a lot of fun for our 6 year old and his friends! It is a generous size and it is nice that it folds down, although it is quite heavy - good for durability but a little difficult when putting away. This does take up a good bit of room so make sure you have room in your yard and your garage. We haven't kept it outside so I can't comment on how it fares in the weather.
First of all, this thing is a beast to put together. Properly wrapping and securing the bungee cord is a two person job, at a minimum. Second, the back legs do come off the ground when my 30 pound, two year old jumps too hard. It's not so much that I'm concerned that it will flip, but it's enough that I paused the first few times it happened. All that said, my two year old loves it so much and it's great for expending energy when he's stuck inside. Easy enough take the handle off and fold the legs for storage. I would purchase again, but I do wish it was a little more secure on the ground.
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
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My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.

However, remember that to lose weight you always need to consume fewer calories than you consume. To lose one pound of fat you will need to burn 3500 more calories than you consume. This means that every 8.1 hours you spend on a rebounder trampoline, you can expect to lose one pound. Of course, you need to remember to watch your calorie intake otherwise you are just jumping to help maintain your weight.
Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
To make sure your jumping surface is up for a lot of bouncy feet, you should regularly inspect it and make sure everything is in good shape. Your shock-absorbing jump surface should be well-secured and taut — but not attached too tightly. The action of repetitive jumping needs a somewhat forgiving surface to allow for smoothness and force-absorption. 
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
Trampoline was accepted as an Olympic sport in 2000. In addition, trampolines are part of structured training programs in sports such as gymnastics, diving, figure skating, and freestyle skiing. USA Gymnastics and US Trampoline and Tumbling Association both administer competitive training and development programs in the sport of trampoline. USA Gymnastics oversees Olympic competition in single trampoline. The US Trampoline and Tumbling Association sponsors competition in single trampoline, synchronized trampoline, and double mini-trampoline. Some competitions accept athletes as young as 3 years old, although the majority of competitors are older than 8 years.
My 12 year old daughter goes through mini trampolines a few times a year because she uses it regularly for sensory stimulation. This particular one has lasted the longest( usually 3-4 months) rather than the Gold's Gym mini trampoline (lasted 1 month). The most problematic part of assembly of the Stamina is the need for two people to safely unfold it, however, it is still quite easy to assemble after this step-just screw on the legs and go!
For starters, don't get a rebounder if you want to have fun. Rebounder trampolines aren't for recreational jumping. In fact, you will get bored with a rebounder trampoline pretty quickly even if you expect it to be fun. However, it is a wonderful exercise tool if you would rather jump on a trampoline then practice another form of cardiovascular exercise such as running or biking, then a rebounder trampoline is perfect for your needs.
Other ideas. If you are buying parts for your trampoline you might want to consider choosing some other accessories to make best use of any postage charges you are paying. Popular accessories include: Trampoline access ladders, Trampoline anchor kits, Trampoline tents, Trampoline skirts and Trampoline shoe bags. Hopefully all of these tips will help to keep your trampoline going for many more years to come.
Falls from the trampoline: Think safety netting solves this problem? Think again. It does not seem to have a significant effect on the rate of this kind of injury. There isn't enough research available to explain why, but it may be because safety enclosures aren't installed correctly, because kids climb on the netting, and/or because the enclosures can wear out quickly. Warranties for enclosure nets (and padding; see below) are usually shorter than warranties for other parts of the trampoline.
Before jumping, check for dangerous looseness, fraying, holes or wear to prevent injuries when jumping. Because slippery surfaces are dangerous for bouncing, you should also always make sure your trampoline is dry and clear of snow or rain. If you do find damage, don't try to fix it on your own with home solutions like duct tape. Foreign materials can affect the spring and the quality of bounce. Instead, replace the surface with another jumping mat of the same size and high quality.

Using a rebounder trampoline allows you to burn 7.2 calories per minute, which is about 432 calories per hour. The average runner can expect to burn around 100 calories per mile. This means (on average) that you would need to run over 4 miles to get the same workout that you would get with an hour on a rebounder. Since many people despise running, there isn't a better reason to use a rebounder trampoline.
- The metal connections of the frame will start to rip your bungee cord. Once I noticed what was happening I cut some strips of fabric and wrapped and tied it around the cracks in the metal frame where the pieces of metal met. This has given the bungee cord a smooth surface and slowed the friction and ripping of the cord. Wish I would have done this from the start.
The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
This trampoline is awesome! The box was delivered in the early afternoon and thank goodness I have an awesome UPS guy. This box was heavy and HUGE, so he brought it in the house for me. My 2 year old, not surprisingly, was so excited, so my husband and I promptly began to set it up. First things first, there are a ton of pieces. We got everything out and read through the directions to make sure we knew what needed to be done. The only con with this trampoline was that when going through the pieces we noticed that 3 of the bar covers (foam pieces like pool noodles that cover the metal bars that hold up the net) were completely ripped in half. Not a huge deal, as this can easily be remedied, but a little disappointing which is why I took off a star. The directions were easy enough to follow and also showed pictures which helped in a few areas that we got confused by. I'm not sure how long it it supposed to take to put this thing together, but it took my husband and I all afternoon, and evening. There were a few breaks in between for meals and we were also doing this with our 2 year old son which I'm sure made it take much longer than normal. Once we finally got it put together, my son was eager to try it out. The trampoline is very well made and extremely sturdy! My son loved having his very own trampoline and I loved knowing that he was having so much fun and was safe. My older kids have used a similar trampoline when they were younger while visiting family, but this trampoline is so much better. I have never seen one that folds for easy storage. It's fairly easy to fold and once folded is extremely easy to move around and because it folds so thin will be very easy to store when needed. I have already recommended this trampoline to a few friends of mine with children similar in ages to mine, and would totally buy this!
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
I was worried that the resistance bands wouldn't be as springy as metal springs would be, but I was wrong. The mat feels stable and responds well to bounces. Both of us are well under the weight limit of 250 pounds, so we tried some more extreme bounces to see if they would affect performance. In the end, that initial trial had us jumping up and down like kids, lifting our legs, slamming them into the mat when we came down, and pretty much stress testing it as much as possible while we did.
Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.
I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!

Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
Avoid bringing accessories and other objects onto the jumping surface. This means removing all jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings — especially accessories that are sharp. Check your kids' pockets for jagged, pointy or bulky forgotten items before they jump, and remove their hats or hairclips as well. Never wear shoes, as they can damage the jumping mat. Trampoline socks can be used to increase the traction on your children's feet and help reduce their likelihood of falling. 
A fantastic way to prevent injuries and keep your kids safe on a trampoline is to install or maintain a strong safety net that protects both the jumper and the springs of the trampoline. Many trampoline models come with safety nets built into the design, and if not, you can purchase an enclosure net as an additional accessory and install it according to the size of your trampoline. 
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