Where Can You Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Orlando FL


We've had this trampoline for about 7 months now and after 6 months of use the bungee cord, that holds the net in place, broke due to normal use with children in the weight range that the trampoline specifies it's for. When we took the bungee cord off, it was quite worn in the places that it was wrapped around the trampoline frame so it was inevitable that it would snap. I did contact Galt and they replaced the bungee cord at no cost to me. I expect that it will probably break again down the line.

Competitive trampoline programs use a rectangular trampoline that is significantly different in size, quality, and cost than a recreational trampoline. Competition-style trampolines have center mats that are 7 ft by 14 ft. They are surrounded by a rim of padding over the springs and the 10-ft by 17-ft frame. These trampolines are raised off the ground and have 6 ft of end-deck padding. They do not have enclosure netting present. Within the competition setting, these trampolines have an additional 5- to 6-ft radius of padding present on the floor. In the training setting, competitive trampolines may be either raised off the ground, or "pit" trampolines, which are located at ground level. Either a bungee system or a rope and pulley system with a harness is used as athletes master tumbling skills.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.

The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
Remember when you remove the old bounce mat to take off the springs in even stages around the edge so as to maintain the tension across the bounce mat evenly until you only have four springs left attaching it at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock, then finally remove these. When installing the new mat start by putting these four springs on first and then build up the tension by gradually putting springs on to split the gaps. You will find this makes it much easier when you come to the final ones.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself.

My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it.


Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 

To keep the safety net and surface of your trampoline optimized for hazard-free jumping, set up the trampoline with safety accessories and position it in the best possible way. Covering the frame, bars, edges, springs, hooks, safety net poles, etc. with shock-absorbing protective padding helps to prevent cuts and bumps and minimize the danger of falls.
Rebounders have been around since 1975 and have a few different names, mini trampolines, fitness trampoline or exercise trampoline but they all mean the same thing, ‘the best exercise to stay fit'.  These little exercise trampolines are perfect for everyone no matter what your age or fitness level.  They are really easy to assemble, most of then can be setup in around 10 mins.
The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.

The Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe and progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, weight loss, and circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Improve your fitness with the Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline.
Among the most common injuries in all age groups, include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 37 to 39 percent of all injuries and can be potentially catastrophic, the authors reported. Especially frightening was one study cited by LaBotz and her colleagues that found that 1 in 200 trampoline injuries resulted in some sort of permanent neurologic damage.
In this instance, if high winds are forecast, it might be wise to secure the trampoline cover with some rope or strong twine as most covers are not designed for severe weather conditions.
It's been damn near a year (11 months) with our trampoline, and here's how it worked out. After hours everyday of my four year old and my husband (seperately!) jumping on this, a few of the stretchy bands underneath tore/ripped off completely. No one was hurt when our trampoline broke. Thankfully it didn't violently snap in half or anything. So with my boys very upset. I immediately reordered this! We also had bought a toddler trampoline last year and it broke in pieces after two months. This trampoline held up a long time after heavy use! Trampoline
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