Who Is Selling Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Otter Creek FL


Approximately 20% of trampoline injuries have been attributable to direct contact with the springs and frame. However, similar to concerns regarding enclosure use, current literature on the effects of padding use on injury is sparse. Available data suggest that the availability and use of padding does not seem to correlate with decreased rates of injury.8,10 Rapid deterioration of padding has been cited as 1 potential reason for the lack of safety efficacy.8,10
In fact, they're the main reason I went to such lengths to put this through its paces. While I can't speak for the future, so far there don't seem to be any problems with mine and this was the time when most of the negative reviews said things started to go wrong. I certainly don't doubt the people who had those experiences, but considering the number of reviews mentioning this, it might have been a defect with those particular items rather than a more widespread problem.
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
While researching this trampoline, I found a few negative reviews with pictures showing the tension bands losing spring, the mats falling apart, and in one case the legs snapping off. I bought this one anyway because I didn't feel like, in the worst case scenario, wasting $23.50 would be a big deal, but the reviews stayed in my mind this whole time.
With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.

It's been damn near a year (11 months) with our trampoline, and here's how it worked out. After hours everyday of my four year old and my husband (seperately!) jumping on this, a few of the stretchy bands underneath tore/ripped off completely. No one was hurt when our trampoline broke🤗 Thankfully it didn't violently snap in half or anything. So with my boys very upset. I immediately reordered this! We also had bought a toddler trampoline last year and it broke in pieces after two months. This trampoline held up a long time after heavy use!
The biggest draw for this particular model is that it's made to come apart and fold away when you're not using it. You can unscrew the legs, remove the frame pad, and fold the frame in on itself like a piece of camping equipment. This means that we can store this in the hall closet when we're not using it, then take it out when it's time to get some activity in.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this. Orthopedic injuries associated with backyard trampoline use in children
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