How To Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Cleveland FL


Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.
One major aspect not mentioned is age. The older the child the more "firm" their bones are. My middle child was a young walker and excellent in gross motor skills. We had a smaller trampoline that we let her jump on since 12mo. At 20mo she just landed wrong and broke her femur. Nothing else to stop that from happening other than her age. We sold that trampoline so fast. Won't be buying another one ever and won't go to trampoline parks either. Not worth the pain and financial strain, not to mention the emotional toll it takes on the child.
Using these exercise trampolines has also been found to improve your lymphatic system.  The main job of the lymphatic system is to filter your blood and to remove accumulated toxins and heavy metals.  Your lymphatic system does not have a pump like your heart to move the lymphatic fluid around your body.  When your muscles contract, this pushes the lymphatic fluid around your body through a series of one way valves.   When jumping on the rebounder the change in gravitational forces allows the lymphatic fluid to be pumped around your body.  This then helps to remove toxins and heavy metals from your body.
This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.

Bought this for my wife 10 months ago. She uses it 3-4 times per week and the Trampoline is stretched and wore out. Description says that it rated for 250 lbs no way this is true. My wife is around 150 lbs and look at the attached pictures of how it held up to a person around 150 lbs. Recommend not purchasing this item unless you want to buy a new one every year.
Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.

Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.


Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.
Competitive trampoline programs use a rectangular trampoline that is significantly different in size, quality, and cost than a recreational trampoline. Competition-style trampolines have center mats that are 7 ft by 14 ft. They are surrounded by a rim of padding over the springs and the 10-ft by 17-ft frame. These trampolines are raised off the ground and have 6 ft of end-deck padding. They do not have enclosure netting present. Within the competition setting, these trampolines have an additional 5- to 6-ft radius of padding present on the floor. In the training setting, competitive trampolines may be either raised off the ground, or "pit" trampolines, which are located at ground level. Either a bungee system or a rope and pulley system with a harness is used as athletes master tumbling skills.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
There are some rebounders which are designed to bounce a lot and some which don't. If you want to use a rebounder to boost your lymphatic system, it is important that you get one with plenty of bounce so that you can generate plenty of gravitational forces. If you solely want it for cardio, the level of bounce will have little effect on how high your heart rate goes up if you stay on the rebounder long enough.
Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.
Trampolines from Little Tikes are so much fun, your kids will never want to stop jumping! This Little Tikes 3-foot kid's trampoline is the perfect size to provide hours of bouncing fun! Little Tikes knows it is important for kids to stay active, and the 3-foot trampoline is easy to move so kids can bounce wherever they like any time they like! Now this best-selling trampoline has folding capabilities for easy storage, too! Also, this trampoline will make a fun gift for a special occasion. It is wonderful for low-impact exercise in a playroom or backyard. This product is ideal for offering lots of enjoyment and activity for your little ones. You are sure to be pleased with the Little Tikes 3' Trampoline, which is both convenient and functional.

The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."
Other ideas. If you are buying parts for your trampoline you might want to consider choosing some other accessories to make best use of any postage charges you are paying. Popular accessories include: Trampoline access ladders, Trampoline anchor kits, Trampoline tents, Trampoline skirts and Trampoline shoe bags. Hopefully all of these tips will help to keep your trampoline going for many more years to come.
Trampolining is a low impact, low stress workout for the body. 10 – 20 minutes of trampolining is about equal to half an hour of jogging! Because the trampoline mat absorbs some of the shock of impact, there is no strain on the joints. A repeated low impact exercise builds and strengthens the bones and muscles which results in toning, better balance, co-ordination and good posture. It has also been proven to reduce the risk of arthritis and osteoporosis.
Trampolining is exercise in disguise. It uses almost every muscle, specifically the stomach, arms and legs. Muscles are toned, fat is burned and metabolism is increased making a trampoline a successful tool for weight loss. Please be advised that although the trampoline, like any other sport or exercise equipment, is considered safe, the safety rules and precautions should be observed.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
The surface is heavy-duty, too, and the rebounding surface even has a safety pad. This trampoline has thirty-band tension resistance, and each band is about two inches wide, so you can be sure of reliability and durability. The trampoline includes a limited manufacturer's warranty, and this means the frame is warrantied for one year and the parts for 90 days.

And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.
We know it might be hard for your little ones to wait their turn to jump… and it certainly doesn't sound as exciting to jump solo. That's one of the reasons we've created a variety of trampoline accessories, giving the whole family an opportunity to play. Check out some add-ons that might be a game-changer for your family, including basketball hoops, a volleyball net, a double toss game, a bounce back game, a football game, and more!
In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.
This is a great trampoline. My 5 yo loves it, and has had it for a couple years. He jumps on it a lot and it still looks new. The handle is nice for extra balance (although as my child has gotten older he doesn't hold the handle as much). The fabric around the outside keeps them from jumping through the ropes on accident. The legs can pull off for storage, but we have never stored it, it gets used all the time. I've seen other brands of trampolines at friend's houses, and they either don't have the fabric outside (dangerous) or they are already saggy in the middle (lame) or they have lots of extra buttons and gadgets on the front for noises or sounds or something (unnecessary). This one seems great.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself. Trampolines: A safe, fun activity for your kids?
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