Shop For Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Warm Mineral Springs FL


Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself.

On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.
In children younger than 14 years, rates of swimming injuries were similar to those for trampoline.6 Once again, exposure comparisons are difficult, but home swimming pools and home trampolines do share some features in terms of injury risk. Home trampolines and home swimming pools are both considered by many insurance companies to be "attractive nuisances" capable of enticing children into potentially dangerous situations. As such, many homeowner insurance policies have trampoline exclusions or mandate that trampolines are within enclosed areas with restricted access, similar to rules for swimming pools and spas. A key difference between swimming pools and trampolines is that evidence-based safety recommendations for home swimming pools (ie, 4-sided fencing that completely isolates the pool from the house and yard) are a broadly publicized focus for many groups concerned with public safety, but trampoline safety information has not been as well studied or as widely disseminated. Many parents and supervising adults do not appear to be aware of key components of trampoline safety, such as limiting the trampoline to 1 user at a time, and this may contribute significantly to current injury rates.8

Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 
This is one among the specially manufactured trampolines for the kids. This trampoline has a handle made out of high-quality steel and this handle is padded. The bouncer pad is also made out of high-quality material and is a rectangle in shape. It is made up of high-quality material and is suitable for kids between 3 to 7 years.  It can be folded easily and is portable.
"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."
To make sure your jumping surface is up for a lot of bouncy feet, you should regularly inspect it and make sure everything is in good shape. Your shock-absorbing jump surface should be well-secured and taut — but not attached too tightly. The action of repetitive jumping needs a somewhat forgiving surface to allow for smoothness and force-absorption. 
My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it. Are trampolines safe for children?
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