Where Can I Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Hampton FL


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Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt.
Avoid bringing accessories and other objects onto the jumping surface. This means removing all jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings — especially accessories that are sharp. Check your kids' pockets for jagged, pointy or bulky forgotten items before they jump, and remove their hats or hairclips as well. Never wear shoes, as they can damage the jumping mat. Trampoline socks can be used to increase the traction on your children's feet and help reduce their likelihood of falling. 

Approximately 20% of trampoline injuries have been attributable to direct contact with the springs and frame. However, similar to concerns regarding enclosure use, current literature on the effects of padding use on injury is sparse. Available data suggest that the availability and use of padding does not seem to correlate with decreased rates of injury.8,10 Rapid deterioration of padding has been cited as 1 potential reason for the lack of safety efficacy.8,10
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
The information listed above was obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Nationwide, its affiliates and employees do not guarantee improved results based upon the information contained herein and assume no liability in connection with the information or the provided safety suggestions. The recommendations provided are general in nature; unique circumstances may not warrant or require implementation of some or all of the safety suggestions. There may be additional available safety procedures that are not referenced on this webpage.
The evolving pattern of trampoline use and injury resulted in a series of published policy statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 1977, 1981, and 1999.1–3 The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons issued trampoline safety position statements in 2005 and 2010.4 The Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine issued a joint statement on trampoline use in 2007.5 These statements all discouraged recreational and playground use of trampolines and urged caution with and further study of trampoline use in supervised training and physical education settings.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
This trampoline is very easy to assemble and it can be done by a single person within 5 minutes. It is a specially designed trampoline for kids and this trampoline can bear weight about 150 pounds. The bouncer mat is made up of high-quality material and it also has a circular foam pad to enhance safety features. The disassembly of this trampoline is very easy. There is a handle that offers complete grip and support to the kid. This handle is padded for safety.
What about mini-trampolines like the one my kids use? There's no question they are safer than the big contraptions—very few injuries end up being serious—but Weiss warns that their seeming innocuousness can itself be a problem because mini-trampoline jumping tends to be poorly supervised by parents (yep, guilty), and jumpers also tend to be younger (my 3-year-old loves it). And there's no evidence either way about whether those handles make them safer. Young kids are especially at risk using trampolines of any type because their balance and body awareness is so terrible. My youngest walks into a wall at least twice a day, so why would I think she'd be fine jumping on an uneven elastic surface?

Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.


You will find much more information about trampolines, the health benefits of trampoline exercise and the various safety aspects to consider and a review of other popular trampolines on the market today.


Stamina Products Inc. was founded in 1987, and was one of the first companies to develop infomercial products, with the introduction of the American Gladiator Home Gym. Stamina products additionally include the popular AeroPilates Performer, InStride Walker, Body Dome, and GYROTONIC Transformer. In addition to the Stamina brand, the company's products include Body by Jake, Suzanne Somers, Tony Little, Cosmopolitan, Brenda DyGraf, Denise Austin, and BodyShaping brands.

Don't overwork yourself here. You are in for the long haul. Especially if you are using your rebounder trampoline as a replacement for cardiovascular exercise. Do small jumps and set yourself at a pace which you feel comfortable with. Your breathing should become more rapid, but not a level in which you are uncomfortable. Even if this means that you hop without your feet leaving the surface of the rebounder mat.
This is one among the specially manufactured trampolines for the kids. This trampoline has a handle made out of high-quality steel and this handle is padded. The bouncer pad is also made out of high-quality material and is a rectangle in shape. It is made up of high-quality material and is suitable for kids between 3 to 7 years.  It can be folded easily and is portable.
This one is pretty obvious… make sure there's nothing under the trampoline! The trampoline should be on a level surface, and check underneath to make sure there's no toys, pets, chickens, pet chickens, little brothers or sisters, big pointy things, boulders, etc. I think it's safe to say that the only thing that should be under your trampoline is grass. Or dirt depending on if your lawn isn't doing so hot this year.

I love the Little tikes trampoline line. So of course I love the biggest version. We are a trampoline family! It's our favorite pass time during the summer and fall months. Trust me when I say the quality is a big deal with trampolines. We've had many break at the seam after only a month or so of use. This material feels strong and the stitching is well done. Looking forward to a fun summer with screams of joy from the kiddos jumping on this! Please note I am writing this review as a part of a contest but my statements are true!

I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!


Before you or the kids get on the trampoline to jump, always make sure there's nothing beneath the mat. Little ones may look at the under-area as a place to play and store toys, but objects below the trampoline can pose a serious risk if your kids land on them through the mat while jumping. Make sure no ladders, tools, toys or chairs are resting beneath the mat — and make sure no one is playing there, either! Keep other family members and pets away from the area surrounding the trampoline when someone is bouncing. Your trampoline surface itself should be completely clear of toys, pets and other objects before jumping time. 
Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline. The Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe, progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, overall muscle strength, to aid in weight loss, and to improve circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Start slowly and progress at your own speed. By adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, you will progress to a more complete cardiovascular workout. You don't need an expensive gym membership to get fit. And you don't need a large workout area at home. Rebound while you watch TV, then fold and store it away in a closet or under the bed. - Rugged, all-steel frame construction 36 inch diameter - Folds for easy storage - Safety pad - Heavy-duty rebounding surface - Thirty tension band resistance, each are 2 inches wide for durability and stability - Six detachable rubber-tipped legs
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
Trampoline Spring Padding. Probably the most likely part to need replacing on your trampoline is the spring padding. Over the years the fabric, however well made, will deteriorate under strong sunshine and in heavy winds. The cold weather can also make it brittle which results in it cracking. It is important not to use the trampoline without any spring padding as someone could fall on the frame and receive an injury if it is not protected.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.

I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump. I do have a past injury to my knee (torn meniscus) so I've always been hesitant to do too much high impact activity. I have found jumping to be easy and I haven't had one problem with my knee yet.
Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24
Approximately 20% of trampoline injuries have been attributable to direct contact with the springs and frame. However, similar to concerns regarding enclosure use, current literature on the effects of padding use on injury is sparse. Available data suggest that the availability and use of padding does not seem to correlate with decreased rates of injury.8,10 Rapid deterioration of padding has been cited as 1 potential reason for the lack of safety efficacy.8,10

I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!

Trampoline was accepted as an Olympic sport in 2000. In addition, trampolines are part of structured training programs in sports such as gymnastics, diving, figure skating, and freestyle skiing. USA Gymnastics and US Trampoline and Tumbling Association both administer competitive training and development programs in the sport of trampoline. USA Gymnastics oversees Olympic competition in single trampoline. The US Trampoline and Tumbling Association sponsors competition in single trampoline, synchronized trampoline, and double mini-trampoline. Some competitions accept athletes as young as 3 years old, although the majority of competitors are older than 8 years.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
The mat is adequate in quality and the overall springiness is great for most types of exercise. Overall, we were impressed at the build quality of this trampoline for the price. It is definitely *the* best-buy rebounder that doesn't outright suck. You aren't getting any extras or special features, such as handle bars. But you do get a quality product that's excellent for beginners who don't want to invest too much.
With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
UPDATE: 15 days of using this just to get my blood pumping because I do so much work on the computer, and I am pleasantly surprised to find that I have lost a little over 2 pounds! I usually use it for 10 minutes at a time, at least 3 times per day (just before mealtime, usually). I've also notice that my cardio fitness has improved. I don't wear myself out on the trampoline - I just put some Motown music on and bounce to the beat - it doesn't seem like much effort, but apparently, it's enough for overall health improvements in a very short time.

In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.

One major aspect not mentioned is age. The older the child the more "firm" their bones are. My middle child was a young walker and excellent in gross motor skills. We had a smaller trampoline that we let her jump on since 12mo. At 20mo she just landed wrong and broke her femur. Nothing else to stop that from happening other than her age. We sold that trampoline so fast. Won't be buying another one ever and won't go to trampoline parks either. Not worth the pain and financial strain, not to mention the emotional toll it takes on the child.
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