Who Is Selling Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Loughman FL


"I think parents see the soft springy mat and they think it's safe, like water," LaBotz said. "What they don't realize is that once you get it to bouncing, especially if there are multiple users, it can be dangerous. Bigger kids and adults like to rocket propel up the little kids, getting them to bounce higher than they would otherwise and if the kid comes down wrong, it is the same as falling 9 or 10 feet onto a hard surface."
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data.
One major aspect not mentioned is age. The older the child the more "firm" their bones are. My middle child was a young walker and excellent in gross motor skills. We had a smaller trampoline that we let her jump on since 12mo. At 20mo she just landed wrong and broke her femur. Nothing else to stop that from happening other than her age. We sold that trampoline so fast. Won't be buying another one ever and won't go to trampoline parks either. Not worth the pain and financial strain, not to mention the emotional toll it takes on the child.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
This rebounder is a personal sized trampoline that is sturdy and fills that hard to fill niche in your fitness regimen. The high-quality materials and superior construction guarantee that this rebounder will last for years, giving you an endless amount of fun and fitness for your one-time investment. Most personal sized trampolines are not tall enough to support full sized adult jumping, and not strong enough to be used not only as a fun diversion- but also as a serious exercise tool.
Please Note: If you select Express or Expedited shipping, your order must be received and credit must be approved by 12:30 p.m. EST, or it may not be processed until the next business day. Expedited shipping is available for select products. You can view complete shipping options for your product in your shopping cart. The estimated delivery date for your order will be provided on the order review page prior to completing the order.
© 1995-2018 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "All Rights Reserved." This website and its contents may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. "American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons" and its associated seal and "American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons" and its logo are all registered U.S. trademarks and may not be used without written permission.

The recent growth of trampoline as a competitive sport, the emergence of commercial indoor trampoline parks, research on the efficacy of safety measures, and more recently recognized patterns of catastrophic injury with recreational trampoline use have prompted a review of the current literature and an update of previous AAP policy statements regarding trampolines.

Trampoline Frames: The trampoline frame is at the heart of the trampoline for its safety and performance. It is vital that the frame is in good condition. It may be possible if you find damage or corrosion to source a new part and replace that section but if this isn't possible, or the frame is beyond economic repair, you will probably have to scrap it. Inspect the frame carefully. Look for corrosion from water that has got inside the trampoline ring and is causing rust from the inside which might not be easily visible but causing a weakening of the trampoline frame. Many cheap trampolines will not galvanise the inside of the trampoline tubing and this does leave them liable to failure in this way.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."

This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.
A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
This is one among the specially manufactured trampolines for the kids. This trampoline has a handle made out of high-quality steel and this handle is padded. The bouncer pad is also made out of high-quality material and is a rectangle in shape. It is made up of high-quality material and is suitable for kids between 3 to 7 years.  It can be folded easily and is portable.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself.
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10

Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
First of all, this thing is a beast to put together. Properly wrapping and securing the bungee cord is a two person job, at a minimum. Second, the back legs do come off the ground when my 30 pound, two year old jumps too hard. It's not so much that I'm concerned that it will flip, but it's enough that I paused the first few times it happened. All that said, my two year old loves it so much and it's great for expending energy when he's stuck inside. Easy enough take the handle off and fold the legs for storage. I would purchase again, but I do wish it was a little more secure on the ground.

Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.
The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up. Trampoline Park Safety Standards Act
×