Where To Find Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Midway FL


Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24

A trampoline can provide huge health benefits for the whole family and hours of fun. They have become more popular in recent years, but with their increased popularity there has come about an increased number of accidents through their use.

This can also help with cellulite removal. Cellulite isn't formed by having too much fat - it's caused by excess toxins in your lymphatic system. So by rebounding, not only will you feel healthier day in and day out, but you'll also look healthier if you currently have cellulite. (Ladies, this is especially true if you have it on your butts and thighs.)


Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.

Trampoline safety recommendations have consistently advised adult supervision when children are on the trampoline. However, multiple studies reveal that approximately one-third to one-half of injuries8,12,17–19 occurred despite reported adult supervision. These authors have raised concerns regarding supervision complacency, particularly when safety measures are in place, as well as lack of adult knowledge and intervention regarding risk behavior with trampoline use.
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Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline. The Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe, progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, overall muscle strength, to aid in weight loss, and to improve circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Start slowly and progress at your own speed. By adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, you will progress to a more complete cardiovascular workout. You don't need an expensive gym membership to get fit. And you don't need a large workout area at home. Rebound while you watch TV, then fold and store it away in a closet or under the bed. - Rugged, all-steel frame construction 36 inch diameter - Folds for easy storage - Safety pad - Heavy-duty rebounding surface - Thirty tension band resistance, each are 2 inches wide for durability and stability - Six detachable rubber-tipped legs
Trampoline jumping poses a high risk of injury for children. The activity can result in sprains and fractures in the arms or legs — as well as potentially serious head and neck injuries. The risk of injury is so high that the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages the use of trampolines at home. Trampoline park injuries also are an area of emerging concern.

The inventor of the Trampoline Safety Net that protects millions of happy kids around the world, Mark Publicover, created TrampolineSafety.com to encourage the companies using his many trampoline inventions to build longer lasting safety components. JumpSport, the family owned business founded by Mark in 1997, sponsors and owns this website. We are completely transparent about how we gather over 40 data points and measurements. All testing is conducted by JumpSport using its state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

Never let more than one child use the trampoline at the same time. Statistics show that accidents are much more likely when two or more persons are using the trampoline at the same time with the lightest person most likely to be injured.
"For a child, there is nothing more fun than defying gravity and soaring as high as you can," says Ahmed A. Bazzi, D.O., orthopedic surgeon at Children's Hospital of Michigan DMC. "I was once a kid too. The trouble lies in the force exerted by the landing on the child's softer bones, growth plates and ligaments. This is also magnified by the poor motor skills and balancing of a young child under the age of 6. The risks of injury certainly outweigh any perceived physical activity or exercise benefit that may exist."
Some trampoline models promoted as safe can have some major weaknesses and flaws particularly the budget trampolines which are often made of low quality materials and are poorly constructed. Ensure that the tubing used for the trampoline is of adequate thickness to prevent breakages and that the trampoline is not too light weight which may cause it to move around or flip over during use.
Remember when you remove the old bounce mat to take off the springs in even stages around the edge so as to maintain the tension across the bounce mat evenly until you only have four springs left attaching it at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock, then finally remove these. When installing the new mat start by putting these four springs on first and then build up the tension by gradually putting springs on to split the gaps. You will find this makes it much easier when you come to the final ones.
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
Some trampoline models promoted as safe can have some major weaknesses and flaws particularly the budget trampolines which are often made of low quality materials and are poorly constructed. Ensure that the tubing used for the trampoline is of adequate thickness to prevent breakages and that the trampoline is not too light weight which may cause it to move around or flip over during use.

Trampoline Net/Trampoline Enclosure: The trampoline net can become damaged in high winds if garden debris is blown into it or maybe the trampoline has been blown over and the safety enclosure got damaged in the process. The net can also be damaged by children gabbing it while they are jumping and pulling it down.


What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.

"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."


I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!

"For a child, there is nothing more fun than defying gravity and soaring as high as you can," says Ahmed A. Bazzi, D.O., orthopedic surgeon at Children's Hospital of Michigan DMC. "I was once a kid too. The trouble lies in the force exerted by the landing on the child's softer bones, growth plates and ligaments. This is also magnified by the poor motor skills and balancing of a young child under the age of 6. The risks of injury certainly outweigh any perceived physical activity or exercise benefit that may exist."


Make sure the net you choose is compatible with your trampoline and properly attached to the springs and frame. Don't use hand-me-down nets from friends' trampolines or purchase from non-affiliated websites to save money — to keep your trampoline as safe and sturdy as possible, choose a net made by the same manufacturer as your trampoline model. Follow safety manual instructions for installation. When you do have your safety net all set up, make sure it doesn't extend over the edge and under the jumping mat — blocking visibility under the mat could lead to dangerous conditions like toys or debris being left below the trampoline. 
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in their online article Physical Activity and the Health of Young People, states that "children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease." (For full text and references please click here)
Parents: At JumpSport, we prod, measure, stretch, slam into, test, bounce on, and review 40+ criteria to make sure show that we live up to our mission of keeping your family safe. Based on our 20 years of leadership in the industry, and with over 17 patents and pioneering safety innovations, we know that safety is only good if it lasts. Typical, low-priced trampolines, and even some high-priced modes, quickly become unsafe and actually cost more per year to maintain safe use or to replace compared with JumpSport and AlleyOOP trampolines.
I'm giving it 2 stars instead of 1 simply because it lasted a year, but today the bungee cord that holds it together snapped completely. I inspected the underside and saw there were several areas where the rope was wearing and you could see the elastic, which is several ultra thin pieces, not a big solid elastic piece. Disappointing to think I spent extra for this one and it only lasted a year. My son is less than 40 lbs and no one else ever used it.
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself.
One of the customers on Amazon said, "I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump." Customers have given a positive response to this product. Stamina wishes to satisfy its customers fully. Therefore, the main purpose of this product is to satisfy its customers. You will not regret buying this product.

With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
What about mini-trampolines like the one my kids use? There's no question they are safer than the big contraptions—very few injuries end up being serious—but Weiss warns that their seeming innocuousness can itself be a problem because mini-trampoline jumping tends to be poorly supervised by parents (yep, guilty), and jumpers also tend to be younger (my 3-year-old loves it). And there's no evidence either way about whether those handles make them safer. Young kids are especially at risk using trampolines of any type because their balance and body awareness is so terrible. My youngest walks into a wall at least twice a day, so why would I think she'd be fine jumping on an uneven elastic surface?
Do either 1) small jumps where you barely leave the rebounder or 2) small movements where you don't leave the rebounder at all. You want your breathing to get faster and you want to break a sweat, but you don't want to be struggling to complete 10-15 minutes on your rebounder. To learn more about rebounding exercise, you can check out our blog post here.
The action of bouncing up and down against gravity strengthens all body systems and is considered one of the most beneficial aerobic exercises ever developed. The heart itself is strengthened due to the increased heart rate. Trampolining also benefits the lymphatic system. The lymph provides nutrients to each and every cell and rids the human body of various wastes. The immune system is boosted and helps in detoxifying. Circulation is increased releasing energy and pumping oxygen into the brain.
We know it might be hard for your little ones to wait their turn to jump… and it certainly doesn't sound as exciting to jump solo. That's one of the reasons we've created a variety of trampoline accessories, giving the whole family an opportunity to play. Check out some add-ons that might be a game-changer for your family, including basketball hoops, a volleyball net, a double toss game, a bounce back game, a football game, and more!
At jumpstreet® your safety is our Number One Priority! Through years of research we have developed our patented trampoline system for your enjoyment. We are one of the lead indoor trampoline park companies involved in putting the ASTM safety standards into place and we are a founding member and on the board of directors for the International Association of Indoor Trampoline Parks. Please see below for our very important rules that will assist in keeping you safe and having FUN!
Using these exercise trampolines has also been found to improve your lymphatic system.  The main job of the lymphatic system is to filter your blood and to remove accumulated toxins and heavy metals.  Your lymphatic system does not have a pump like your heart to move the lymphatic fluid around your body.  When your muscles contract, this pushes the lymphatic fluid around your body through a series of one way valves.   When jumping on the rebounder the change in gravitational forces allows the lymphatic fluid to be pumped around your body.  This then helps to remove toxins and heavy metals from your body.
Using a rebounder for lymph drainage is one of the great benefits of this type of trampoline. In turn, this can help enhance your immune system with a higher level of white blood cells. You may have heard of these in a science class growing up.  However, the lymphatic system is actually part of the circulatory system and pumps around lymphocyte cells to help remove toxins from your body.

What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.

Netting and other perimeter enclosures to prevent falls from the trampoline were first commercially available in 1997, and the American Society for Testing and Materials produced a safety standard for enclosures in 2003. There is a paucity of literature on the effects of netting and other safety measures on injury risk. However, current evidence suggests that the availability of enclosures on the market has not significantly affected the proportions of injuries attributable to falls off the trampoline,10 and there does not appear to be an inverse correlation between presence of safety equipment and rates of injury.8 Proposed reasons for lack of efficacy of safety enclosures include positioning of enclosures on the outside of the frame8 and inappropriate installation and maintenance.10 Children are often tempted to climb or grasp the netting, which may be an additional source of injury.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt.
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