Where To Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In Inverness Highlands North FL


Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
Trampoline Cover. In future, a good tip is to remove the spring padding at the end of the season to protect it from the elements. Alternatively buy a trampoline cover to give added protection to the whole trampoline. The trampoline cover will help protect the bounce mat, springs, spring padding and to some extent the frame also by preventing rain water getting inside the tubing. Some people collapse the safety enclosure on to the centre of the trampoline at the end of the Autumn and cover the whole thing with the trampoline cover.

Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.


Type of bounce: Some rebounders will give you a lot of bounce, and others will give you barely any at all. Don't be tricked into thinking that the more bounce, the better the rebounder is. It really depends on what you're using the rebounder for - if it's mainly for cardio, then get a lot of bounce; if it's mainly for lymphatic system "cleanup", get one with not a lot of bounce. The latter will be easier to do and you won't get as tired.
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Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.

Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 
This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.

The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data. Serious Injuries Prompt Recall of Mini-Trampolines
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