Where To Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Clermont FL


The Stamina 36 inch Trampoline stands on 6 legs. These legs are made of steel, hence rust resistant. They provide a strong structure to the frame. These legs are rubber-tipped so they do provide a stable structure to the trampoline. These legs are detachable as well, so you can keep de-assemble the structure is ever needed. Hence, stability and support are sure to be imparted in this product.
This is a great trampoline. My 5 yo loves it, and has had it for a couple years. He jumps on it a lot and it still looks new. The handle is nice for extra balance (although as my child has gotten older he doesn't hold the handle as much). The fabric around the outside keeps them from jumping through the ropes on accident. The legs can pull off for storage, but we have never stored it, it gets used all the time. I've seen other brands of trampolines at friend's houses, and they either don't have the fabric outside (dangerous) or they are already saggy in the middle (lame) or they have lots of extra buttons and gadgets on the front for noises or sounds or something (unnecessary). This one seems great.

The special feature of the urban rebounder trampoline is the two different sizes of hinge legs. These legs offer a versatile workout to the user. The frames in this trampoline are made up of solid metal with corrosion resistant technology. The bouncer mat is made up of highly durable mesh material. This trampoline folds easily and it occupies very small space for storage. The jumping surface is very soft and it is connected to the mat with the help of the springs. The weight bearing capacity of this trampoline is about 300 pounds and suits the best for adults and kids.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
Avoid bringing accessories and other objects onto the jumping surface. This means removing all jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings — especially accessories that are sharp. Check your kids' pockets for jagged, pointy or bulky forgotten items before they jump, and remove their hats or hairclips as well. Never wear shoes, as they can damage the jumping mat. Trampoline socks can be used to increase the traction on your children's feet and help reduce their likelihood of falling. 
Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.
Trampoline Spring Padding. Probably the most likely part to need replacing on your trampoline is the spring padding. Over the years the fabric, however well made, will deteriorate under strong sunshine and in heavy winds. The cold weather can also make it brittle which results in it cracking. It is important not to use the trampoline without any spring padding as someone could fall on the frame and receive an injury if it is not protected.

Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline. The Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe, progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, overall muscle strength, to aid in weight loss, and to improve circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Start slowly and progress at your own speed. By adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, you will progress to a more complete cardiovascular workout. You don't need an expensive gym membership to get fit. And you don't need a large workout area at home. Rebound while you watch TV, then fold and store it away in a closet or under the bed. - Rugged, all-steel frame construction 36 inch diameter - Folds for easy storage - Safety pad - Heavy-duty rebounding surface - Thirty tension band resistance, each are 2 inches wide for durability and stability - Six detachable rubber-tipped legs
The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  
Avoid bringing accessories and other objects onto the jumping surface. This means removing all jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings — especially accessories that are sharp. Check your kids' pockets for jagged, pointy or bulky forgotten items before they jump, and remove their hats or hairclips as well. Never wear shoes, as they can damage the jumping mat. Trampoline socks can be used to increase the traction on your children's feet and help reduce their likelihood of falling. 
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
One of the customers on Amazon said, "I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump." Customers have given a positive response to this product. Stamina wishes to satisfy its customers fully. Therefore, the main purpose of this product is to satisfy its customers. You will not regret buying this product.

Trampoline was accepted as an Olympic sport in 2000. In addition, trampolines are part of structured training programs in sports such as gymnastics, diving, figure skating, and freestyle skiing. USA Gymnastics and US Trampoline and Tumbling Association both administer competitive training and development programs in the sport of trampoline. USA Gymnastics oversees Olympic competition in single trampoline. The US Trampoline and Tumbling Association sponsors competition in single trampoline, synchronized trampoline, and double mini-trampoline. Some competitions accept athletes as young as 3 years old, although the majority of competitors are older than 8 years.
My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it.
This trampoline has an easy set up, and though it's said that you might need two people to set it up, if there's just one of you, you can use your body weight to unfold it on your own. This trampoline also bounces really well, and it's neither overly stiff nor overly flexible, so you can make it work just perfectly. There is a chance that, if you jump, you will improve your posture over time. You may also notice that if you jump, your lymph nodes will drain, and you will feel that the trampoline is a good health investment.
Competitive trampoline programs use a rectangular trampoline that is significantly different in size, quality, and cost than a recreational trampoline. Competition-style trampolines have center mats that are 7 ft by 14 ft. They are surrounded by a rim of padding over the springs and the 10-ft by 17-ft frame. These trampolines are raised off the ground and have 6 ft of end-deck padding. They do not have enclosure netting present. Within the competition setting, these trampolines have an additional 5- to 6-ft radius of padding present on the floor. In the training setting, competitive trampolines may be either raised off the ground, or "pit" trampolines, which are located at ground level. Either a bungee system or a rope and pulley system with a harness is used as athletes master tumbling skills.
Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.
Some of the cons are that the trampoline might stretch out rather quickly, and if you are a heavy trampoline jumper, you may notice this happening more quickly. It may not last as long as you might expect it too. Some of the critics say that the trampoline will start sagging within a year, so keep in mind that, with an inexpensive product, you may want to replace it regularly, if you can.
Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."
Rebounders have been around since 1975 and have a few different names, mini trampolines, fitness trampoline or exercise trampoline but they all mean the same thing, ‘the best exercise to stay fit'.  These little exercise trampolines are perfect for everyone no matter what your age or fitness level.  They are really easy to assemble, most of then can be setup in around 10 mins.
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.
To keep the safety net and surface of your trampoline optimized for hazard-free jumping, set up the trampoline with safety accessories and position it in the best possible way. Covering the frame, bars, edges, springs, hooks, safety net poles, etc. with shock-absorbing protective padding helps to prevent cuts and bumps and minimize the danger of falls.
Approximately 20% of trampoline injuries have been attributable to direct contact with the springs and frame. However, similar to concerns regarding enclosure use, current literature on the effects of padding use on injury is sparse. Available data suggest that the availability and use of padding does not seem to correlate with decreased rates of injury.8,10 Rapid deterioration of padding has been cited as 1 potential reason for the lack of safety efficacy.8,10
Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
Do either 1) small jumps where you barely leave the rebounder or 2) small movements where you don't leave the rebounder at all. You want your breathing to get faster and you want to break a sweat, but you don't want to be struggling to complete 10-15 minutes on your rebounder. To learn more about rebounding exercise, you can check out our blog post here.
Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.

The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up.


But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Using a rebounder trampoline allows you to burn 7.2 calories per minute, which is about 432 calories per hour. The average runner can expect to burn around 100 calories per mile. This means (on average) that you would need to run over 4 miles to get the same workout that you would get with an hour on a rebounder. Since many people despise running, there isn't a better reason to use a rebounder trampoline.
With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.
This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.

"Kids get hurt on trampolines", he says, "for one of two reasons, I think. There's obviously different exceptions. One is just more than one person on a trampoline. That's the number one rule that we teach. The other type of injury, I feel, is kids doing things that are above their skill level. Their friend can do a flip so they're going to try one without knowing the progressions. And I believe that's when they get hurt."
Many people who give up running complain that their feet and ankles simply can't handle the workout anymore. If this is you, then you should consider using a rebounder trampoline. Since the trampoline mat and springs will absorb most of the pressure from your workout, you can still get a great workout without sacrificing your feet and ankle joints as much.
In children younger than 14 years, rates of swimming injuries were similar to those for trampoline.6 Once again, exposure comparisons are difficult, but home swimming pools and home trampolines do share some features in terms of injury risk. Home trampolines and home swimming pools are both considered by many insurance companies to be "attractive nuisances" capable of enticing children into potentially dangerous situations. As such, many homeowner insurance policies have trampoline exclusions or mandate that trampolines are within enclosed areas with restricted access, similar to rules for swimming pools and spas. A key difference between swimming pools and trampolines is that evidence-based safety recommendations for home swimming pools (ie, 4-sided fencing that completely isolates the pool from the house and yard) are a broadly publicized focus for many groups concerned with public safety, but trampoline safety information has not been as well studied or as widely disseminated. Many parents and supervising adults do not appear to be aware of key components of trampoline safety, such as limiting the trampoline to 1 user at a time, and this may contribute significantly to current injury rates.8
Many of these accidents can be reduced by following some simple guidelines. It is also important to ensure you purchase the right trampoline and trampoline accessories. Trampoline nets and trampoline padding can prevent or reduce injury considerably.

The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.


The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.
Destini had been showing her mom gymnastics moves she'd been practicing when the accident happened. Like many parents, Prouty had assumed that as long as her daughter followed general safety rules such as only one child on the trampoline at a time, Destini would be fine. But even when safety precautions are taken, trampolines can still be dangerous, said Dr. Michele LaBotz, a lead author of the new AAP statement and a sports medicine physician at Intermed Sports Medicine in Portland, Me.
This trampoline is very easy to assemble and it can be done by a single person within 5 minutes. It is a specially designed trampoline for kids and this trampoline can bear weight about 150 pounds. The bouncer mat is made up of high-quality material and it also has a circular foam pad to enhance safety features. The disassembly of this trampoline is very easy. There is a handle that offers complete grip and support to the kid. This handle is padded for safety.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
There are some rebounders which are designed to bounce a lot and some which don't. If you want to use a rebounder to boost your lymphatic system, it is important that you get one with plenty of bounce so that you can generate plenty of gravitational forces. If you solely want it for cardio, the level of bounce will have little effect on how high your heart rate goes up if you stay on the rebounder long enough.
Then several months ago, I read a blog article talking about the health benefits that the blogger had by doing rebounder exercises in the past 2 years and how he eventually bought three different rebounders ($ to $$$, with this one being the first bought) and how the expensive one felt so much better. So I thought, hm, maybe I should try a better one too.

The mat is adequate in quality and the overall springiness is great for most types of exercise. Overall, we were impressed at the build quality of this trampoline for the price. It is definitely *the* best-buy rebounder that doesn't outright suck. You aren't getting any extras or special features, such as handle bars. But you do get a quality product that's excellent for beginners who don't want to invest too much.


Then several months ago, I read a blog article talking about the health benefits that the blogger had by doing rebounder exercises in the past 2 years and how he eventually bought three different rebounders ($ to $$$, with this one being the first bought) and how the expensive one felt so much better. So I thought, hm, maybe I should try a better one too.
Children DO need to be taught basic safety skills--like not intentionally rocking the trampoline or going over the handle by not jumling properly and putting too much weight on the handle as opposed to just using it for balance when needed. Most children understand the common sense of this, however, and we find they opt to bounce without holding the handle at all once they are a little more skilled.
Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 
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