How Can You Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Roosevelt Gardens FL


Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously.
Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.

To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.

The steel frame and its six legs, with rubberized bottom caps for added stability, can hold 250 lbs easily. That's more than enough for most people. The assembly in general is pain-free with legible instructions (a rarity in this price range). It will take you up to two hours; the package has 20 parts you have to assemble. You also get a few workout tips but it's nothing serious.
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
So I did some digging. Turns out it's really hard to quantify the risk trampolines pose—I'll explain why in a bit—yet most pediatricians and orthopedists agree: Trampolines are a terrible idea for young kids and not so great for older ones, either. I was pretty shocked to learn that, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, children under 6 should never jump on trampolines. The American Academy of Pediatrics is even more conservative: It "strongly discourages" recreational trampoline use at all ages.
Trampoline Spring Padding. Probably the most likely part to need replacing on your trampoline is the spring padding. Over the years the fabric, however well made, will deteriorate under strong sunshine and in heavy winds. The cold weather can also make it brittle which results in it cracking. It is important not to use the trampoline without any spring padding as someone could fall on the frame and receive an injury if it is not protected.
The surface is heavy-duty, too, and the rebounding surface even has a safety pad. This trampoline has thirty-band tension resistance, and each band is about two inches wide, so you can be sure of reliability and durability. The trampoline includes a limited manufacturer's warranty, and this means the frame is warrantied for one year and the parts for 90 days.
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
Patterns of injury vary by patient age. In retrospective reviews, individuals younger than 6 years accounted for 22% to 37% of individuals with a trampoline-related injury presenting to emergency departments for evaluation.8,16 Although most trampoline injuries are sprains, strains, contusions, or other soft tissue injury, younger children seem to be more prone to bony injury.11,18 According to an analysis of data from the NEISS, 29% of injuries in the 6- to 17-year age group resulted in fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48% in children 5 years and younger.18 Data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program revealed higher rates of hospitalization for trampoline injuries in children younger than 4 years as compared with their older counterparts.9
Type of bounce: Some rebounders will give you a lot of bounce, and others will give you barely any at all. Don't be tricked into thinking that the more bounce, the better the rebounder is. It really depends on what you're using the rebounder for - if it's mainly for cardio, then get a lot of bounce; if it's mainly for lymphatic system "cleanup", get one with not a lot of bounce. The latter will be easier to do and you won't get as tired.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
Trampolines from Little Tikes are so much fun, your kids will never want to stop jumping! This Little Tikes 3-foot kid's trampoline is the perfect size to provide hours of bouncing fun! Little Tikes knows it is important for kids to stay active, and the 3-foot trampoline is easy to move so kids can bounce wherever they like any time they like! Now this best-selling trampoline has folding capabilities for easy storage, too! Also, this trampoline will make a fun gift for a special occasion. It is wonderful for low-impact exercise in a playroom or backyard. This product is ideal for offering lots of enjoyment and activity for your little ones. You are sure to be pleased with the Little Tikes 3' Trampoline, which is both convenient and functional.
"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.
There are some rebounders which are designed to bounce a lot and some which don't. If you want to use a rebounder to boost your lymphatic system, it is important that you get one with plenty of bounce so that you can generate plenty of gravitational forces. If you solely want it for cardio, the level of bounce will have little effect on how high your heart rate goes up if you stay on the rebounder long enough.
The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."

I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!


Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."
Rebound training is challenging, easy on your joints, and lets you slowly progress at your own speed by adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, creating a challenging cardiovascular workout. Best of all for the at-home fitness enthusiast, it doesn't require a great deal of space or expensive equipment -- simply an open spot of floor, and perhaps a training DVD or two. Rebound training has been shown to:
So I did some digging. Turns out it's really hard to quantify the risk trampolines pose—I'll explain why in a bit—yet most pediatricians and orthopedists agree: Trampolines are a terrible idea for young kids and not so great for older ones, either. I was pretty shocked to learn that, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, children under 6 should never jump on trampolines. The American Academy of Pediatrics is even more conservative: It "strongly discourages" recreational trampoline use at all ages.
Type of bounce: Some rebounders will give you a lot of bounce, and others will give you barely any at all. Don't be tricked into thinking that the more bounce, the better the rebounder is. It really depends on what you're using the rebounder for - if it's mainly for cardio, then get a lot of bounce; if it's mainly for lymphatic system "cleanup", get one with not a lot of bounce. The latter will be easier to do and you won't get as tired.
Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.
Trampoline Jump Mat: The trampoline mat may have holes in it caused by things falling on it like branches or fireworks (a common culprit!) or even a cigarette end. The trampoline mat (or jump mat as it is sometimes known) can be replaced. You will need to know the size of your trampoline, the shape of it and the number of springs it has to attach to. You may also need a spring tool to remove the old trampoline mat and install the new one. It can be hard work to do this without a spring tool. Make sure that any new trampoline mat is made of A grade Permatron Polypropylene, which is UV resistant, and sewn with UV resistant thread. The V rings to attach to the springs should also be galvanised to prevent rust.

The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12
The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  
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