Where To Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Cheapest In Nobleton FL


Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
Rebound training is challenging, easy on your joints, and lets you slowly progress at your own speed by adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, creating a challenging cardiovascular workout. Best of all for the at-home fitness enthusiast, it doesn't require a great deal of space or expensive equipment -- simply an open spot of floor, and perhaps a training DVD or two. Rebound training has been shown to:

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Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
Many cheap trampolines use a PE material which will probably require replacing annually as the material tends to crack in the sunlight. Spending a little more on better quality spring padding can save money in the long run.

Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.

The recent growth of trampoline as a competitive sport, the emergence of commercial indoor trampoline parks, research on the efficacy of safety measures, and more recently recognized patterns of catastrophic injury with recreational trampoline use have prompted a review of the current literature and an update of previous AAP policy statements regarding trampolines.
If any parts of the trampoline are damaged avoid use and purchase the correct replacements before continuing.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."

The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
The AAP recommends not purchasing or using any size recreational trampoline for your home, or using one at other homes or on playgrounds. Trampolines should only be used as part of a supervised training program in gymnastics, diving, or other competitive sport. Most importantly, only one person should be training on the trampoline at a time, and always under direct supervision.
In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.
Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously. Trampoline use in homes and playgrounds
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