Who Is Selling Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Discount In Mayo FL


Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.
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Trampolining is a low impact, low stress workout for the body. 10 – 20 minutes of trampolining is about equal to half an hour of jogging! Because the trampoline mat absorbs some of the shock of impact, there is no strain on the joints. A repeated low impact exercise builds and strengthens the bones and muscles which results in toning, better balance, co-ordination and good posture. It has also been proven to reduce the risk of arthritis and osteoporosis.

The recent growth of trampoline as a competitive sport, the emergence of commercial indoor trampoline parks, research on the efficacy of safety measures, and more recently recognized patterns of catastrophic injury with recreational trampoline use have prompted a review of the current literature and an update of previous AAP policy statements regarding trampolines.


Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.

The Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline is an effective, safe and progressive way to exercise at home or at the office for improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, weight loss, and circulation. Studies have shown that rebounding has many positive health benefits. Rebounding can go almost anywhere--fold it and take it with you--so you'll stick to your workout routine and get fit. Improve your fitness with the Stamina 36-inch Folding Trampoline.


So I did some digging. Turns out it's really hard to quantify the risk trampolines pose—I'll explain why in a bit—yet most pediatricians and orthopedists agree: Trampolines are a terrible idea for young kids and not so great for older ones, either. I was pretty shocked to learn that, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, children under 6 should never jump on trampolines. The American Academy of Pediatrics is even more conservative: It "strongly discourages" recreational trampoline use at all ages.
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.

Netting and other perimeter enclosures to prevent falls from the trampoline were first commercially available in 1997, and the American Society for Testing and Materials produced a safety standard for enclosures in 2003. There is a paucity of literature on the effects of netting and other safety measures on injury risk. However, current evidence suggests that the availability of enclosures on the market has not significantly affected the proportions of injuries attributable to falls off the trampoline,10 and there does not appear to be an inverse correlation between presence of safety equipment and rates of injury.8 Proposed reasons for lack of efficacy of safety enclosures include positioning of enclosures on the outside of the frame8 and inappropriate installation and maintenance.10 Children are often tempted to climb or grasp the netting, which may be an additional source of injury.
Pediatricians should counsel their patients and families against recreational trampoline use and explain that current data indicate safety measures have not significantly reduced injury rates and that catastrophic injuries do occur. For families who persist in home trampoline use despite this recommendation, pediatricians should advise parents and their children on the following guidelines until better information becomes available:
If some of the trampoline enclosure poles, top caps or sleeves are missing, or damaged, then these can easily be replaced too rather than buying a whole new trampoline enclosure kit.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.
"Unfortunately, injuries happen for the same reasons trampolines are fun," says Lori DeBold, M.D., vice chair of pediatrics at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, in Fountain Valley, California. "A child has some, but not total, control over how high she bounces and where she lands." Nearly two-thirds of trampoline accidents are caused by children jumping at the same time and crashing into one another. If you believe that the benefits of a backyard trampoline outweigh the risks, follow these rules from the safety experts.
Bought this for my wife 10 months ago. She uses it 3-4 times per week and the Trampoline is stretched and wore out. Description says that it rated for 250 lbs no way this is true. My wife is around 150 lbs and look at the attached pictures of how it held up to a person around 150 lbs. Recommend not purchasing this item unless you want to buy a new one every year.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
According to the royal society for the prevention of accidents approximately 75% of injuries occur when more than one person is on the trampoline with the person weighing less five times more likely to be injured. Children of a young age are particularly vulnerable to injury. Also unless the child is supervised by a trained 'spotter', adult supervision seems to do little to prevent accidents with about half of all injuries occurring with adult supervision.
Springless or springfree trampolines use reinforced fibreglass rods or elastic rather then springs. These trampoline are often promoted as safer then trampolines with springs. However because of their design the entire surface rotates each time the user hits the mat. This can cause pain and discomfort and even result in long term damage to the knees over time. Also many of the cheap models create an inferior bounce compared to the spring trampolines.
This one is pretty obvious… make sure there's nothing under the trampoline! The trampoline should be on a level surface, and check underneath to make sure there's no toys, pets, chickens, pet chickens, little brothers or sisters, big pointy things, boulders, etc. I think it's safe to say that the only thing that should be under your trampoline is grass. Or dirt depending on if your lawn isn't doing so hot this year.
The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.

According to the royal society for the prevention of accidents approximately 75% of injuries occur when more than one person is on the trampoline with the person weighing less five times more likely to be injured. Children of a young age are particularly vulnerable to injury. Also unless the child is supervised by a trained 'spotter', adult supervision seems to do little to prevent accidents with about half of all injuries occurring with adult supervision.


"For a child, there is nothing more fun than defying gravity and soaring as high as you can," says Ahmed A. Bazzi, D.O., orthopedic surgeon at Children's Hospital of Michigan DMC. "I was once a kid too. The trouble lies in the force exerted by the landing on the child's softer bones, growth plates and ligaments. This is also magnified by the poor motor skills and balancing of a young child under the age of 6. The risks of injury certainly outweigh any perceived physical activity or exercise benefit that may exist."
If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.
My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.
Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.
"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7', enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too!

My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it. Are trampolines safe for children?
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