Where To Shop For Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Best Price In Lake Worth Corridor FL


If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.
While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.
Among the most common injuries in all age groups, include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 37 to 39 percent of all injuries and can be potentially catastrophic, the authors reported. Especially frightening was one study cited by LaBotz and her colleagues that found that 1 in 200 trampoline injuries resulted in some sort of permanent neurologic damage.
Don't be tempted to use a spring that is a different length than those you have. It will cause the performance of your trampoline to be reduced significantly.
Not everybody has the time or capability to run a mile every day or go biking across town. Many people recognize a need to exercise but look for more efficient ways to get it done. The best thing about exercising with a rebounder trampoline is that you can be right at home watching your favorite TV show while keeping up with your cardio. It is also really great for your lymphatic and immune system. Those with small children or people they need to keep an eye on will find it convenient to exercise from the comfort of their living room.
I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!
George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.
Trampoline Net/Trampoline Enclosure: The trampoline net can become damaged in high winds if garden debris is blown into it or maybe the trampoline has been blown over and the safety enclosure got damaged in the process. The net can also be damaged by children gabbing it while they are jumping and pulling it down.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)

We know it might be hard for your little ones to wait their turn to jump… and it certainly doesn't sound as exciting to jump solo. That's one of the reasons we've created a variety of trampoline accessories, giving the whole family an opportunity to play. Check out some add-ons that might be a game-changer for your family, including basketball hoops, a volleyball net, a double toss game, a bounce back game, a football game, and more!
Dr. Michele LaBotz, member of the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) explained, "If you get an adult who's about 170 pounds bouncing with a kid who's 40 to 50 pounds, the recoil of the mat, when that kid lands — and especially if he's not landing right — he generates about the same amount of force as if he went from nine feet (three meters) onto a hard surface. And you don't think of that because the mat's kind of soft and bouncy."
George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.
Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt.
Destini had been showing her mom gymnastics moves she'd been practicing when the accident happened. Like many parents, Prouty had assumed that as long as her daughter followed general safety rules such as only one child on the trampoline at a time, Destini would be fine. But even when safety precautions are taken, trampolines can still be dangerous, said Dr. Michele LaBotz, a lead author of the new AAP statement and a sports medicine physician at Intermed Sports Medicine in Portland, Me.
To make sure your jumping surface is up for a lot of bouncy feet, you should regularly inspect it and make sure everything is in good shape. Your shock-absorbing jump surface should be well-secured and taut — but not attached too tightly. The action of repetitive jumping needs a somewhat forgiving surface to allow for smoothness and force-absorption. 

"This is something kids really like," Gaines said. "It's fun and it's something you can do in your backyard. It doesn't have a motor attached. And all of that give parents a false sense of security, especially when you add in safety devices like nets. But this statement is highlighting the fact that there are no data showing that they make it any safer."

Falls from the trampoline: Think safety netting solves this problem? Think again. It does not seem to have a significant effect on the rate of this kind of injury. There isn't enough research available to explain why, but it may be because safety enclosures aren't installed correctly, because kids climb on the netting, and/or because the enclosures can wear out quickly. Warranties for enclosure nets (and padding; see below) are usually shorter than warranties for other parts of the trampoline.


Compared to the original spring model of rebounder, this is a poor knock-off using short elastic bands. The rebound is shallow and very stiff. Reminds me of jumping rope. I can't think of any reason you could really get any benefit from this thing and I wouldn't recommend it at all. Assembly is hazardous at best, lethal at worst, they even state as much in the instructions. I know the spring type rebounders are a lot more expensive now days (I bought my first one for $35 back in the 90's) but a MUCH better exercising action . So, if you're serious about this piece of equipment, shop around for a quality, spring action type and get a couple of extra springs because they break down eventually. I had mine for about 20 years and it was as good as the day I bought it. I kick myself for giving it away.
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7-foot, enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Kids will have a ton of bouncing fun with this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline, parents will love the easy folding feature for storing. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too! The simple folding design makes this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline is easy to move around the yard. When the jumping is done fold it up and move to where ever you want to store it.
Before you or the kids get on the trampoline to jump, always make sure there's nothing beneath the mat. Little ones may look at the under-area as a place to play and store toys, but objects below the trampoline can pose a serious risk if your kids land on them through the mat while jumping. Make sure no ladders, tools, toys or chairs are resting beneath the mat — and make sure no one is playing there, either! Keep other family members and pets away from the area surrounding the trampoline when someone is bouncing. Your trampoline surface itself should be completely clear of toys, pets and other objects before jumping time. 
Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 

In 2009, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) reported almost 98,000 injuries and 3,100 hospitalizations from recreational trampoline use. Approximately 75% of those injuries occurred when more than one person was jumping at the same time. As you might expect, the smallest children were at the greatest risk; kids under 5 years of age were the most-injured age group.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
When a product is listed as Pre-Order, such product is not yet in stock but is available for advanced purchase on our site, prior to the manufacturer's public release date. Pre-Order items are shipped once in stock and the public release date arrives. You will be notified of a product's updated status by email. The expected shipment time is listed on the Product Detail page.
I bought this one about 2.5 years ago when I first heard about rebounder exercises. Thought it was a good price and I wouldn't regret much even if I didn't like it. Liked it when it first came. Seemed neat-looking and sturdy and bouncy enough to be fun. I put it in front of the TV and the kid and I both enjoyed jumping on it from time to time. But after a while, we lost interest and it was moved to the basement and barely used again.
Before you or the kids get on the trampoline to jump, always make sure there's nothing beneath the mat. Little ones may look at the under-area as a place to play and store toys, but objects below the trampoline can pose a serious risk if your kids land on them through the mat while jumping. Make sure no ladders, tools, toys or chairs are resting beneath the mat — and make sure no one is playing there, either! Keep other family members and pets away from the area surrounding the trampoline when someone is bouncing. Your trampoline surface itself should be completely clear of toys, pets and other objects before jumping time. 
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."
"Kids get hurt on trampolines", he says, "for one of two reasons, I think. There's obviously different exceptions. One is just more than one person on a trampoline. That's the number one rule that we teach. The other type of injury, I feel, is kids doing things that are above their skill level. Their friend can do a flip so they're going to try one without knowing the progressions. And I believe that's when they get hurt."

If any parts of the trampoline are damaged avoid use and purchase the correct replacements before continuing.
Many cheap trampolines use a PE material which will probably require replacing annually as the material tends to crack in the sunlight. Spending a little more on better quality spring padding can save money in the long run.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up.
Pediatricians should counsel their patients and families against recreational trampoline use and explain that current data indicate safety measures have not significantly reduced injury rates and that catastrophic injuries do occur. For families who persist in home trampoline use despite this recommendation, pediatricians should advise parents and their children on the following guidelines until better information becomes available:
Several cases of vertebral artery dissection presenting 12 to 24 hours after a neck injury on the trampoline have been reported. Vertebral artery dissections are the result of abrupt cervical hyperextension and rotation. Trauma to the artery may result in an intramural thrombus, which can cause a subsequent dissection of the vessel and possible intracranial emboli. These are often devastating injuries and may produce lasting neurologic complications.25,26 Any neck pain associated with trampoline use requires prompt medical evaluation and diagnostic assessment.
When a product is listed as Pre-Order, such product is not yet in stock but is available for advanced purchase on our site, prior to the manufacturer's public release date. Pre-Order items are shipped once in stock and the public release date arrives. You will be notified of a product's updated status by email. The expected shipment time is listed on the Product Detail page.

UPDATE: 15 days of using this just to get my blood pumping because I do so much work on the computer, and I am pleasantly surprised to find that I have lost a little over 2 pounds! I usually use it for 10 minutes at a time, at least 3 times per day (just before mealtime, usually). I've also notice that my cardio fitness has improved. I don't wear myself out on the trampoline - I just put some Motown music on and bounce to the beat - it doesn't seem like much effort, but apparently, it's enough for overall health improvements in a very short time.
"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."
Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.

George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.
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