How Can I Get Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Discount In Hawthorne FL


To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."
Of course we went over all of the common excuses that grownups use to justify the purchase of a trampoline: it's good for our health, it keeps the lymphatic system working properly, it'll make our regular workouts more effective. And sure, all of that is true, but I think my wife and I both knew that we were going to make this investment because it was fun.
Sadly, we don't live in that time anymore, so it's time to break the news to you: trampolines aren't safe. They're giant bouncy surfaces for kids with undeveloped coordination to fling themselves around on. This actually isn't news, but it has been in the news lately because a mother put out a now-viral picture of her three-year-old in a cast after he broke his femur at a trampoline park. When she took her kid to a doctor, she was told that kids under six shouldn't even be allowed on household trampolines, much less set loose to bounce around at a trampoline park with a ton of other people. And more to the point, she was told that all of this was already in the safety recommendations written by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Trampoline-related fractures of the proximal tibia have been described in children 6 years and younger.15,22 These injuries have included transverse fractures as well as more subtle torus-types injuries. These injuries occurred when young children were sharing the trampoline with larger individuals, resulting in greater impact forces, as discussed previously. Trampoline use in homes and playgrounds

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