Where To Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Best Price In Hudson FL


My 12 year old daughter goes through mini trampolines a few times a year because she uses it regularly for sensory stimulation. This particular one has lasted the longest( usually 3-4 months) rather than the Gold's Gym mini trampoline (lasted 1 month). The most problematic part of assembly of the Stamina is the need for two people to safely unfold it, however, it is still quite easy to assemble after this step-just screw on the legs and go!
Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.
Trampoline Net/Trampoline Enclosure: The trampoline net can become damaged in high winds if garden debris is blown into it or maybe the trampoline has been blown over and the safety enclosure got damaged in the process. The net can also be damaged by children gabbing it while they are jumping and pulling it down.
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.
The Stamina 36 inch Trampoline stands on 6 legs. These legs are made of steel, hence rust resistant. They provide a strong structure to the frame. These legs are rubber-tipped so they do provide a stable structure to the trampoline. These legs are detachable as well, so you can keep de-assemble the structure is ever needed. Hence, stability and support are sure to be imparted in this product.
First of all, this thing is a beast to put together. Properly wrapping and securing the bungee cord is a two person job, at a minimum. Second, the back legs do come off the ground when my 30 pound, two year old jumps too hard. It's not so much that I'm concerned that it will flip, but it's enough that I paused the first few times it happened. All that said, my two year old loves it so much and it's great for expending energy when he's stuck inside. Easy enough take the handle off and fold the legs for storage. I would purchase again, but I do wish it was a little more secure on the ground.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
When you're bouncing your way to better health together, it's important to jump under the best conditions to ensure trampoline safety — so everyone can enjoy some hazard-free physical fun that will keep your kids interested in exercise. If you're wondering how to lessen trampoline injuries and keep your kids safe, SkyBound USA is here to help. Here are our top tips for trampoline safety:
Lay out a set of ground rules for what they can do on the trampoline. For example, make sure no toys are on the trampoline when jumping, and limit the number of people who can be on it at a time. This will help to ensure the weight limit isn't exceeded as well as reduce the likelihood of collisions while jumping. You can involve the kids in this step by getting them to help you come up with the list of rules. Have the kids help you make a big sign — poster, wood, whatever medium you can use — and keep it near the trampoline or posted near their other outdoor toys. Encourage all kids who play on the trampoline to be "rule enforcers" — it could help keep everyone on their best behavior and encourage them to report unsafe play immediately.
"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data. Serious Injuries Prompt Recall of Mini-Trampolines
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