Where Can You Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampolines In University Park FL


Also, the cover may rip, so keep that in mind (though it is possible that the cover can be fixed with a little home repair knowledge). Also, the trampoline may not be very bouncy, and even though a relatively small person bounces on it, it can lose its bounce fairly quickly. The trampoline may not last much longer than three months. The trampoline also smells a little bit off, and it may contain cancerous agents. Also, there's a chance that the trampoline might come with mold on parts of it (mesh, nuts, bolts). So, as you can see, there are a number of negatives to owning this trampoline.
What I found interesting was that instead of metal springs like you would find in most trampolines, this one uses thirty two-inch wide tension bands placed around the frame. This is probably to help it fold more easily, but I liked the idea that it would have fewer metal parts in general since those can be sharp and if I'm going to be playing with the frame frequently, I'd rather avoid things that could cut or scratch me.

I wish the weight limit was a little higher than 55lbs because all our little friends want to use it, regardless of whether they're big kids or littler ones! Also, the unscrew mechanism on each side to get it to fold is very difficult. I understand they don't want kids doing it, but as a grown woman I can barely get it! Overall for the price, it's a good deal though!
Interestingly, gravitational pulls boost the lymphatic system at a much higher level than many other cardiovascular exercises since, after all, you are jumping up and down. You would be hard-pressed to find another exercise mechanism than using a rebounder for lymph drainage. If you want to boost your immune system and lymphatic system at an optimum level, then start using a rebounder for lymph drainage.
The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12

Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.


Parents: At JumpSport, we prod, measure, stretch, slam into, test, bounce on, and review 40+ criteria to make sure show that we live up to our mission of keeping your family safe. Based on our 20 years of leadership in the industry, and with over 17 patents and pioneering safety innovations, we know that safety is only good if it lasts. Typical, low-priced trampolines, and even some high-priced modes, quickly become unsafe and actually cost more per year to maintain safe use or to replace compared with JumpSport and AlleyOOP trampolines.
Don't overwork yourself here. You are in for the long haul. Especially if you are using your rebounder trampoline as a replacement for cardiovascular exercise. Do small jumps and set yourself at a pace which you feel comfortable with. Your breathing should become more rapid, but not a level in which you are uncomfortable. Even if this means that you hop without your feet leaving the surface of the rebounder mat.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.

But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
"If a child is on a trampoline with other users, especially if the other users are heavier than the child, as the other individuals come down and recoil back up, if the child at that very moment is coming down and their body meets this trampoline mat coming up with great velocity, there'll be a tremendous amount of energy transferred to that child's foot and ankle and leg. And that's a setup for injury.

Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 


Trampoline was accepted as an Olympic sport in 2000. In addition, trampolines are part of structured training programs in sports such as gymnastics, diving, figure skating, and freestyle skiing. USA Gymnastics and US Trampoline and Tumbling Association both administer competitive training and development programs in the sport of trampoline. USA Gymnastics oversees Olympic competition in single trampoline. The US Trampoline and Tumbling Association sponsors competition in single trampoline, synchronized trampoline, and double mini-trampoline. Some competitions accept athletes as young as 3 years old, although the majority of competitors are older than 8 years.

The "bouncy-ness" of the trampoline is on the lighter end. Since it does not use the traditional springs there is not as much push-back or bounce. I am not sure how to really describe it. For small children getting mini-trampoline to work for then can be hard. Especially if that child has developmental delays such as low muscle tone or equilibrium problems. My son still gets the trampoline "going" to the point where I can hear the feet leave the floor. Eventually we are going to have to get a standard mini-trampoline but this had held up and is in excellent condition even though it has taken massive abuse by my son and several cousins.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.
The inventor of the Trampoline Safety Net that protects millions of happy kids around the world, Mark Publicover, created TrampolineSafety.com to encourage the companies using his many trampoline inventions to build longer lasting safety components. JumpSport, the family owned business founded by Mark in 1997, sponsors and owns this website. We are completely transparent about how we gather over 40 data points and measurements. All testing is conducted by JumpSport using its state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.
First, it's probably a good idea to lower the enclosure poles of your trampoline, as the enclosure net acts as a sail and can pick up your trampoline with a good wind storm. It's also a good idea to invest in steel wind stakes, which will help anchor your trampoline to the ground. And last of all, please don't just stand by your trampoline when a storm is approaching. We don't know why you would… but better not.

Pediatricians should counsel their patients and families against recreational trampoline use and explain that current data indicate safety measures have not significantly reduced injury rates and that catastrophic injuries do occur. For families who persist in home trampoline use despite this recommendation, pediatricians should advise parents and their children on the following guidelines until better information becomes available:
In fact, they're the main reason I went to such lengths to put this through its paces. While I can't speak for the future, so far there don't seem to be any problems with mine and this was the time when most of the negative reviews said things started to go wrong. I certainly don't doubt the people who had those experiences, but considering the number of reviews mentioning this, it might have been a defect with those particular items rather than a more widespread problem.
Using a rebounder for lymph drainage is one of the great benefits of this type of trampoline. In turn, this can help enhance your immune system with a higher level of white blood cells. You may have heard of these in a science class growing up.  However, the lymphatic system is actually part of the circulatory system and pumps around lymphocyte cells to help remove toxins from your body.

The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  
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