Where Can I Buy A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Hillsboro Pines FL


All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself. Trampolines: A safe, fun activity for your kids?
Rebound training is challenging, easy on your joints, and lets you slowly progress at your own speed by adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, creating a challenging cardiovascular workout. Best of all for the at-home fitness enthusiast, it doesn't require a great deal of space or expensive equipment -- simply an open spot of floor, and perhaps a training DVD or two. Rebound training has been shown to:
Several cases of vertebral artery dissection presenting 12 to 24 hours after a neck injury on the trampoline have been reported. Vertebral artery dissections are the result of abrupt cervical hyperextension and rotation. Trauma to the artery may result in an intramural thrombus, which can cause a subsequent dissection of the vessel and possible intracranial emboli. These are often devastating injuries and may produce lasting neurologic complications.25,26 Any neck pain associated with trampoline use requires prompt medical evaluation and diagnostic assessment.
Just to give you a quick overview, Stamina 36 Inch Folding Trampoline will arrive at you folded. The hardest part in setting it up is when you need to hold the frame open while pulling the pins that that keep it locked in place. You will definitely need a strong arm with this if done alone. Alternatively, you may be able to use some leverage with a heavy furniture too.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.
I'm giving it 2 stars instead of 1 simply because it lasted a year, but today the bungee cord that holds it together snapped completely. I inspected the underside and saw there were several areas where the rope was wearing and you could see the elastic, which is several ultra thin pieces, not a big solid elastic piece. Disappointing to think I spent extra for this one and it only lasted a year. My son is less than 40 lbs and no one else ever used it.
George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10
The particulars on this are pretty standard. All-steel frame construction with six detachable legs on a 36-inch diameter frame. It's pretty small, but large enough that one or the other of use can fit onto it and use it. It will also sit well in the living room without having to shift the coffee table around too much (have I mentioned how much I hate having to move things frequently?).

The way you set up your trampoline has a lot to do with how safe you make your jumping experience. Avoid hills, slopes or bumpy spots. Instead, install your trampoline on a level surface with sturdy ground — preferably covered by a soft coating like sand, springy lawn, fresh grass or wood chips. You can also put down ground safety pads. A level surface and softening materials make it less likely that your children will fall and ensure that if they do, there's less risk of injury.
With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.
This one is pretty obvious… make sure there's nothing under the trampoline! The trampoline should be on a level surface, and check underneath to make sure there's no toys, pets, chickens, pet chickens, little brothers or sisters, big pointy things, boulders, etc. I think it's safe to say that the only thing that should be under your trampoline is grass. Or dirt depending on if your lawn isn't doing so hot this year.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
We warrant to the original purchaser that the frame in this product is free of defects in materials or workmanship for 1 year from the date of purchase and all other parts are free of defects in material or workmanship for 90 days from the date of purchase (dated sales receipt is required for proof of purchase). Outside U.S.A. and Canada, contact place of purchase for warranty service.
The trampoline was designed as a piece of specialized training equipment for specific sports. Pediatricians should only endorse use of trampolines as part of a structured training program with appropriate coaching, supervision, and safety measures in place. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, the following apply to trampolines used in the training setting:
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10
The NEISS data showed that the youngest kids are at greatest risk for significant injury, including fractures of the legs and spine. Studies have shown that children younger than 6 years old accounted for 22 to 37 percent of all those turning up in the emergency room for evaluation. And NEISS data show that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48 percent in kids 5 years and younger.
I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
We've all heard about trampolines. Especially from kids who tell stories about going to their friend's house and how fun it was to play games on their friend's trampoline. Did you know that trampolines aren't only good for recreational activity? Rebounder trampolines are a great way to get all of the exercise benefits of a normal trampoline without sacrificing too much space on your property.
First, it's probably a good idea to lower the enclosure poles of your trampoline, as the enclosure net acts as a sail and can pick up your trampoline with a good wind storm. It's also a good idea to invest in steel wind stakes, which will help anchor your trampoline to the ground. And last of all, please don't just stand by your trampoline when a storm is approaching. We don't know why you would… but better not.
The lower extremity is the most common site of trampoline injury, accounting for 34% to 50% of injuries.11,20 Of these injuries, 1 study revealed that >60% involved the ankle,20 and approximately three-quarters of ankle injuries were sprains.6 The upper extremities were injured in 24% to 36% of cases. Of these, approximately 60% were fractures.3,11 Upper extremity injuries were more common in participants who fell off the trampoline.12

Excellent Product if you are looking for an efficient way for your kids to burn off energy. A few points that I noticed, the trampoline is well padded and has high walls to help prevent falls, little tikes is built to last! The stitching is very durable in comparison to competitors. The padding adds an additional level of protection so the seams don't split, this is very important since I value quality. I am writing this review as part of a contest. I love how the trampoline is foldable!!! I can leave it outside and fold it or I can wrap it up and store in in my garage.

Trampoline Springs: Your trampoline springs may have become over stretched or corroded over time and require replacement. You will need to know how many springs your trampoline needs, and the length of these when they are at rest (to do this you need to remove one that is in the best condition and not over stretched). Measure the full length of the spring from the outer edges of the hooks at either end.
Children DO need to be taught basic safety skills--like not intentionally rocking the trampoline or going over the handle by not jumling properly and putting too much weight on the handle as opposed to just using it for balance when needed. Most children understand the common sense of this, however, and we find they opt to bounce without holding the handle at all once they are a little more skilled.
Many of these accidents can be reduced by following some simple guidelines. It is also important to ensure you purchase the right trampoline and trampoline accessories. Trampoline nets and trampoline padding can prevent or reduce injury considerably.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.

Among the most common injuries in all age groups, include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 37 to 39 percent of all injuries and can be potentially catastrophic, the authors reported. Especially frightening was one study cited by LaBotz and her colleagues that found that 1 in 200 trampoline injuries resulted in some sort of permanent neurologic damage.
When you're bouncing your way to better health together, it's important to jump under the best conditions to ensure trampoline safety — so everyone can enjoy some hazard-free physical fun that will keep your kids interested in exercise. If you're wondering how to lessen trampoline injuries and keep your kids safe, SkyBound USA is here to help. Here are our top tips for trampoline safety:
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