Where To Find Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Cheapest In Casselberry FL


This is a great trampoline. My 5 yo loves it, and has had it for a couple years. He jumps on it a lot and it still looks new. The handle is nice for extra balance (although as my child has gotten older he doesn't hold the handle as much). The fabric around the outside keeps them from jumping through the ropes on accident. The legs can pull off for storage, but we have never stored it, it gets used all the time. I've seen other brands of trampolines at friend's houses, and they either don't have the fabric outside (dangerous) or they are already saggy in the middle (lame) or they have lots of extra buttons and gadgets on the front for noises or sounds or something (unnecessary). This one seems great.
However, rebounder trampolines are normally only two to four feet in diameter and only a couple feet off the ground. This means you can store them in your house and use them for exercise purposes. After all, it is a lot more fun to jump on a big trampoline than a rebounder trampoline. However, rebounder trampolines are designed for exercise, not for fun.
This trampoline is awesome! The box was delivered in the early afternoon and thank goodness I have an awesome UPS guy. This box was heavy and HUGE, so he brought it in the house for me. My 2 year old, not surprisingly, was so excited, so my husband and I promptly began to set it up. First things first, there are a ton of pieces. We got everything out and read through the directions to make sure we knew what needed to be done. The only con with this trampoline was that when going through the pieces we noticed that 3 of the bar covers (foam pieces like pool noodles that cover the metal bars that hold up the net) were completely ripped in half. Not a huge deal, as this can easily be remedied, but a little disappointing which is why I took off a star. The directions were easy enough to follow and also showed pictures which helped in a few areas that we got confused by. I'm not sure how long it it supposed to take to put this thing together, but it took my husband and I all afternoon, and evening. There were a few breaks in between for meals and we were also doing this with our 2 year old son which I'm sure made it take much longer than normal. Once we finally got it put together, my son was eager to try it out. The trampoline is very well made and extremely sturdy! My son loved having his very own trampoline and I loved knowing that he was having so much fun and was safe. My older kids have used a similar trampoline when they were younger while visiting family, but this trampoline is so much better. I have never seen one that folds for easy storage. It's fairly easy to fold and once folded is extremely easy to move around and because it folds so thin will be very easy to store when needed. I have already recommended this trampoline to a few friends of mine with children similar in ages to mine, and would totally buy this!
Despite previous recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging home use of trampolines, recreational use of trampolines in the home setting continues to be a popular activity among children and adolescents. This policy statement is an update to previous statements, reflecting the current literature on prevalence, patterns, and mechanisms of trampoline-related injuries. Most trampoline injuries occur with multiple simultaneous users on the mat. Cervical spine injuries often occur with falls off the trampoline or with attempts at somersaults or flips. Studies on the efficacy of trampoline safety measures are reviewed, and although there is a paucity of data, current implementation of safety measures have not appeared to mitigate risk substantially. Therefore, the home use of trampolines is strongly discouraged. The role of trampoline as a competitive sport and in structured training settings is reviewed, and recommendations for enhancing safety in these environments are made.
One of the customers on Amazon said, "I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump." Customers have given a positive response to this product. Stamina wishes to satisfy its customers fully. Therefore, the main purpose of this product is to satisfy its customers. You will not regret buying this product.
Using a rebounder trampoline allows you to burn 7.2 calories per minute, which is about 432 calories per hour. The average runner can expect to burn around 100 calories per mile. This means (on average) that you would need to run over 4 miles to get the same workout that you would get with an hour on a rebounder. Since many people despise running, there isn't a better reason to use a rebounder trampoline.
This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.

If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
Among the most common injuries in all age groups, include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 37 to 39 percent of all injuries and can be potentially catastrophic, the authors reported. Especially frightening was one study cited by LaBotz and her colleagues that found that 1 in 200 trampoline injuries resulted in some sort of permanent neurologic damage.
In children younger than 14 years, rates of swimming injuries were similar to those for trampoline.6 Once again, exposure comparisons are difficult, but home swimming pools and home trampolines do share some features in terms of injury risk. Home trampolines and home swimming pools are both considered by many insurance companies to be "attractive nuisances" capable of enticing children into potentially dangerous situations. As such, many homeowner insurance policies have trampoline exclusions or mandate that trampolines are within enclosed areas with restricted access, similar to rules for swimming pools and spas. A key difference between swimming pools and trampolines is that evidence-based safety recommendations for home swimming pools (ie, 4-sided fencing that completely isolates the pool from the house and yard) are a broadly publicized focus for many groups concerned with public safety, but trampoline safety information has not been as well studied or as widely disseminated. Many parents and supervising adults do not appear to be aware of key components of trampoline safety, such as limiting the trampoline to 1 user at a time, and this may contribute significantly to current injury rates.8
And the nets aren't much better. Yes, they'll keep you off the ground, but most trampolines injuries happen on the thing itself. You're landing on a solid—albeit stretchy— surface with more force than a normal fall, and you're flailing around as you do it. Of course you're going to land funny and break some bones once in awhile. And to add insult to literal injury, lots of kids see a net as more of a challenge than a safety feature.
Several cases of vertebral artery dissection presenting 12 to 24 hours after a neck injury on the trampoline have been reported. Vertebral artery dissections are the result of abrupt cervical hyperextension and rotation. Trauma to the artery may result in an intramural thrombus, which can cause a subsequent dissection of the vessel and possible intracranial emboli. These are often devastating injuries and may produce lasting neurologic complications.25,26 Any neck pain associated with trampoline use requires prompt medical evaluation and diagnostic assessment.
Teach your kids proper behavior and methods for jumping. We know bouncing is crazy fun, but sometimes this leads overexcited kids to jump too high and too hard, making it more likely for them to land incorrectly, lose balance or lose control — which, in turn, leads to falling, colliding and injury. To prevent damage, teach them to keep leaps low when they're beginners and to maintain control of jumping at all times. If they feel like they're unable to dictate which direction they're springing in or they feel themselves going too high or too quickly, they need to stop jumping. 
Lay out a set of ground rules for what they can do on the trampoline. For example, make sure no toys are on the trampoline when jumping, and limit the number of people who can be on it at a time. This will help to ensure the weight limit isn't exceeded as well as reduce the likelihood of collisions while jumping. You can involve the kids in this step by getting them to help you come up with the list of rules. Have the kids help you make a big sign — poster, wood, whatever medium you can use — and keep it near the trampoline or posted near their other outdoor toys. Encourage all kids who play on the trampoline to be "rule enforcers" — it could help keep everyone on their best behavior and encourage them to report unsafe play immediately.
What a great way to get a low impact workout! The only flaw with this model is that it is difficult to pop it open and then reclose it for storage. It takes 2 people! You have to use a lot of force to pop it open or get it folded up. I guess that's a safety feature. If it weren't for the difficulty in folding it, I would have given it 5 stars. This rebounder is very sturdy though and is just right for my small workout area.

Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.


When I read the reviews, I was very hesitant to buy it because so many people were saying that it was tearing and people's feet could touch the ground when they jumped on it. I've had mine for 2 weeks and it does great with me exercising (bouncing not jumping) on it every day for 30-60 minutes. I've had people that weighed 200lbs exercise on it and it kept its shape and never tore. I love this little exercise trampoline, it helped me lose 10lbs. I don't fold mine up, I keep it open and out so that I can get on whenever I want to get a little exercise in. I do think that 2 people are needed to assemble it because it can be a little difficult to open it or put the cover on because it's very tight. This trampoline was well worth the money and for something so cheap, I could see it lasting several years if you take care of it (not jumping as high as you can, jumping in the middle of the trampoline, not letting kids use it). The straps are very sturdy and provide a nice bounce when exercising.

I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?

There are many benefits of using a rebounder mini trampoline, and the compact size makes it so easy to store and carry anywhere you want. There are also a handful of exercises you can do on a mini trampoline, and they are not difficult to learn, so everyone in your household can participate. Read more to find out about the Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline, so you can make an informed trampoline decision. Check latest price here.


Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.

When I read the reviews, I was very hesitant to buy it because so many people were saying that it was tearing and people's feet could touch the ground when they jumped on it. I've had mine for 2 weeks and it does great with me exercising (bouncing not jumping) on it every day for 30-60 minutes. I've had people that weighed 200lbs exercise on it and it kept its shape and never tore. I love this little exercise trampoline, it helped me lose 10lbs. I don't fold mine up, I keep it open and out so that I can get on whenever I want to get a little exercise in. I do think that 2 people are needed to assemble it because it can be a little difficult to open it or put the cover on because it's very tight. This trampoline was well worth the money and for something so cheap, I could see it lasting several years if you take care of it (not jumping as high as you can, jumping in the middle of the trampoline, not letting kids use it). The straps are very sturdy and provide a nice bounce when exercising.


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Netting and other perimeter enclosures to prevent falls from the trampoline were first commercially available in 1997, and the American Society for Testing and Materials produced a safety standard for enclosures in 2003. There is a paucity of literature on the effects of netting and other safety measures on injury risk. However, current evidence suggests that the availability of enclosures on the market has not significantly affected the proportions of injuries attributable to falls off the trampoline,10 and there does not appear to be an inverse correlation between presence of safety equipment and rates of injury.8 Proposed reasons for lack of efficacy of safety enclosures include positioning of enclosures on the outside of the frame8 and inappropriate installation and maintenance.10 Children are often tempted to climb or grasp the netting, which may be an additional source of injury.

The biggest draw for this particular model is that it's made to come apart and fold away when you're not using it. You can unscrew the legs, remove the frame pad, and fold the frame in on itself like a piece of camping equipment. This means that we can store this in the hall closet when we're not using it, then take it out when it's time to get some activity in.
This trampoline is great for about a day and then both the rubber on the handle and the blue liner that surrounds the trampoline pad started to rip. I've had it a week and it's already junk. :The handle grip ripped off completely and the liner is ripped too. My kiddo loved it until it fell apart. He's only 2, so he wasn't near over the 55 lb weight limit and jumped on it normally.
Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.

There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
Common trampoline injuries range from muscle strains, bruises, and broken bones to concussions and even spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis. How do these injuries occur? Children get hurt by landing incorrectly on the mat, being struck by another individual, attempting (and failing) to complete stunts (especially flips or summersaults), falling off the trampoline, or landing on the springs of the trampoline. Contrary to popular belief, netting around a trampoline has NOT been found to significantly reduce injuries.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
"Kids get hurt on trampolines", he says, "for one of two reasons, I think. There's obviously different exceptions. One is just more than one person on a trampoline. That's the number one rule that we teach. The other type of injury, I feel, is kids doing things that are above their skill level. Their friend can do a flip so they're going to try one without knowing the progressions. And I believe that's when they get hurt."
We warrant to the original purchaser that the frame in this product is free of defects in materials or workmanship for 1 year from the date of purchase and all other parts are free of defects in material or workmanship for 90 days from the date of purchase (dated sales receipt is required for proof of purchase). Outside U.S.A. and Canada, contact place of purchase for warranty service.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this. Orthopedic injuries associated with backyard trampoline use in children
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