How Can You Get Little Tikes Folding Trampolines Best Price In Micanopy FL


I, too, have a 3-year-old. And a playroom with a mini-trampoline. So of course I'm panic-wondering: Do I need to get rid of it? Should I stop letting my kids go to birthday parties at the local trampoline park? Is the fact that I'm wondering these things proof that I'm an overprotective, killjoy parent? Compelling research suggests that kids fare better when they take physical risks. And so far, my kids haven't gotten so much as a bruise. Where in the risk-benefit balance do trampolines fit?
There are some rebounders which are designed to bounce a lot and some which don't. If you want to use a rebounder to boost your lymphatic system, it is important that you get one with plenty of bounce so that you can generate plenty of gravitational forces. If you solely want it for cardio, the level of bounce will have little effect on how high your heart rate goes up if you stay on the rebounder long enough.
When I read the reviews, I was very hesitant to buy it because so many people were saying that it was tearing and people's feet could touch the ground when they jumped on it. I've had mine for 2 weeks and it does great with me exercising (bouncing not jumping) on it every day for 30-60 minutes. I've had people that weighed 200lbs exercise on it and it kept its shape and never tore. I love this little exercise trampoline, it helped me lose 10lbs. I don't fold mine up, I keep it open and out so that I can get on whenever I want to get a little exercise in. I do think that 2 people are needed to assemble it because it can be a little difficult to open it or put the cover on because it's very tight. This trampoline was well worth the money and for something so cheap, I could see it lasting several years if you take care of it (not jumping as high as you can, jumping in the middle of the trampoline, not letting kids use it). The straps are very sturdy and provide a nice bounce when exercising.

With 5 separate patents and over 25 trampoline safety innovations, AlleyOOP by JumpSport makes the only advanced, safety-engineered trampolines in the world. The average car buyer spends over $2000 for a full set of airbags that will probably never be used, but every time your kids jump on an AlleyOOP trampoline, their growing bodies and your peace of mind will benefit from ALL our proven safety systems.

My only caution is that if your child likes to jump REALLY high while holding the handle, they might push on the handle causing the trampoline to tilt a little. It's not that much, but I am super-careful so I put the trampoline facing the wall (handle side to the wall) to prevent any accidental tips. Also, my husband said the bungee cord rope was really tight and hard to put on, so just plan for that when you assemble it.
Springless or springfree trampolines use reinforced fibreglass rods or elastic rather then springs. These trampoline are often promoted as safer then trampolines with springs. However because of their design the entire surface rotates each time the user hits the mat. This can cause pain and discomfort and even result in long term damage to the knees over time. Also many of the cheap models create an inferior bounce compared to the spring trampolines.
What a great way to get a low impact workout! The only flaw with this model is that it is difficult to pop it open and then reclose it for storage. It takes 2 people! You have to use a lot of force to pop it open or get it folded up. I guess that's a safety feature. If it weren't for the difficulty in folding it, I would have given it 5 stars. This rebounder is very sturdy though and is just right for my small workout area.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
We've all heard about trampolines. Especially from kids who tell stories about going to their friend's house and how fun it was to play games on their friend's trampoline. Did you know that trampolines aren't only good for recreational activity? Rebounder trampolines are a great way to get all of the exercise benefits of a normal trampoline without sacrificing too much space on your property.
The biggest draw for this particular model is that it's made to come apart and fold away when you're not using it. You can unscrew the legs, remove the frame pad, and fold the frame in on itself like a piece of camping equipment. This means that we can store this in the hall closet when we're not using it, then take it out when it's time to get some activity in.
Did some research and bought another quite popular model by another brand at about $300 to $350. "Wow" was how we felt when jumping on the new expensive one. So much bouncier and you can jump very comfortably for so much longer with little effort. We couldn't stop laughing when we compared the two side by side because jumping on them felt SO different. Now my 12 year old enjoys jumping on the new one so much that she often stays on it for half an hour or more until I push her to do something else.
"Several reports on trampoline injuries recommend a ban on private, recreational trampoline use for children. We do not, for several reasons, support such a ban. Jumping on a trampoline gives children the ability to improve their motor control. It may also increase physical activity. The risk of being injured during physical activity must be compared with the risk of being physically inactive. Being physically inactive is associated with many diseases and disorders, and in our view probably represents a greater hazard to children's health."

At jumpstreet® your safety is our Number One Priority! Through years of research we have developed our patented trampoline system for your enjoyment. We are one of the lead indoor trampoline park companies involved in putting the ASTM safety standards into place and we are a founding member and on the board of directors for the International Association of Indoor Trampoline Parks. Please see below for our very important rules that will assist in keeping you safe and having FUN!
After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in their online article Physical Activity and the Health of Young People, states that "children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease." (For full text and references please click here)

The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."

Patterns of injury vary by patient age. In retrospective reviews, individuals younger than 6 years accounted for 22% to 37% of individuals with a trampoline-related injury presenting to emergency departments for evaluation.8,16 Although most trampoline injuries are sprains, strains, contusions, or other soft tissue injury, younger children seem to be more prone to bony injury.11,18 According to an analysis of data from the NEISS, 29% of injuries in the 6- to 17-year age group resulted in fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48% in children 5 years and younger.18 Data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program revealed higher rates of hospitalization for trampoline injuries in children younger than 4 years as compared with their older counterparts.9
A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
Several studies have revealed that approximately three-quarters of injuries occurred when multiple people were using the trampoline at the same time.11–13 The smallest participants were up to 14 times more likely to sustain injury relative to their heavier playmates.14 Heavier users create more recoil of the mat and springs and greater upward impaction forces than smaller users can generate on their own. These forces must be absorbed by the falling body and can be larger than landing on solid ground.15 The risk associated with weight differences in the participants, in combination with less developed motor skills, likely contributes to the increased risk of fractures and dislocations in younger children.
Then several months ago, I read a blog article talking about the health benefits that the blogger had by doing rebounder exercises in the past 2 years and how he eventually bought three different rebounders ($ to $$$, with this one being the first bought) and how the expensive one felt so much better. So I thought, hm, maybe I should try a better one too.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
What we can do to informally estimate the risk, though, is to compare the number of ER visits incited by trampolines with the number caused by other products and then make some inferences. For instance, 80,831 ER visits in 2016 were due to injuries from the use of playground climbing equipment, according to the CPSC. That's nearly 23,000 fewer than from trampolines. I don't have any data on this, but I suspect that American kids collectively spend a lot more time climbing on playgrounds than they do jumping on trampolines. Hell, my 6-year-old probably spends 90 minutes a week climbing on playgrounds and five minutes a week jumping on a trampoline, and we actually own a trampoline. So it's not a stretch to deduce that trampolines are far more dangerous per hour of use.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
So far, it doesn't seem to be showing many signs of wear and tear. The padded frame mat looks a little shoddy now, which is disappointing after such a short period of time, but on an up note it's easier to put on. I would like to think that's because I've gotten stronger in the intervening time, but really it's more likely that the elastic portions are getting stretched out from repeated use. For the moment, it still does its job of giving a little bit of cushion to the frame itself, though without metal springs to protect me from it seems a bit extraneous.
Trampoline Spring Padding. Probably the most likely part to need replacing on your trampoline is the spring padding. Over the years the fabric, however well made, will deteriorate under strong sunshine and in heavy winds. The cold weather can also make it brittle which results in it cracking. It is important not to use the trampoline without any spring padding as someone could fall on the frame and receive an injury if it is not protected.
Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.
Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.
If the trampoline has a welded frame check the condition of the welds carefully to ensure there is no fracture. This is a common area for the trampoline to fail, perhaps from overloading or just from a poor quality weld.
My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this.

When I read the reviews, I was very hesitant to buy it because so many people were saying that it was tearing and people's feet could touch the ground when they jumped on it. I've had mine for 2 weeks and it does great with me exercising (bouncing not jumping) on it every day for 30-60 minutes. I've had people that weighed 200lbs exercise on it and it kept its shape and never tore. I love this little exercise trampoline, it helped me lose 10lbs. I don't fold mine up, I keep it open and out so that I can get on whenever I want to get a little exercise in. I do think that 2 people are needed to assemble it because it can be a little difficult to open it or put the cover on because it's very tight. This trampoline was well worth the money and for something so cheap, I could see it lasting several years if you take care of it (not jumping as high as you can, jumping in the middle of the trampoline, not letting kids use it). The straps are very sturdy and provide a nice bounce when exercising.

To make things worse, trampoline injuries tend to be more severe than injuries caused by other notably dangerous activities. When the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program compared the proportion of injuries caused by various activities that resulted in hospital admission, they found that trampolining ranked second only after downhill skiing: 12.4 percent of trampoline injuries led to hospital admissions compared with 12.9 percent of skiing injuries. Among the activities that were ranked as less dangerous in this regard than trampolining: snowboarding, bicycling, sledding, skateboarding, ice hockey, and football. (In fact, football injuries were four times less likely to lead to hospitalization as trampoline injuries.) Jennifer Weiss, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon based in Los Angeles and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, put it to me this way: "Trampoline injuries are one of the most common reasons that we see people in our orthopedic clinic." If you're wondering whether trampolines have gotten safer since you were a kid, the answer unfortunately seems to be no. Although trampoline standards were tightened in the '90s, leading to more widespread use of spring and frame safety pads as well as boundary nets, a 2010 study found that these changes hadn't led to fewer injuries and concluded that "whatever has been done is not yet working."
All products have advantages and disadvantages. This rebounding Stamina product is effective to use. It does provide a fantastic exercise experience. It is durable, weather-proof and stable. But it also has some negatives like no enclosure net and small size. The product is cheap for the services it provides. Therefore, if this mini trampoline suits your needs, then buy one and see for yourself. Trampolines: A safe, fun activity for your kids?
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