Purchase Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In High Springs FL


The evolving pattern of trampoline use and injury resulted in a series of published policy statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 1977, 1981, and 1999.1–3 The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons issued trampoline safety position statements in 2005 and 2010.4 The Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine issued a joint statement on trampoline use in 2007.5 These statements all discouraged recreational and playground use of trampolines and urged caution with and further study of trampoline use in supervised training and physical education settings.
George Nissen, a competitive gymnast, patented the modern trampoline as a "tumbling device" in 1945. Nissen initially designed the trampoline as a training tool for acrobats and gymnasts and subsequently promoted it for military aviator training. Recreational use of trampolines is a more recent phenomenon, driven primarily by the increased availability of relatively inexpensive trampolines marketed for home use.
The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
The trampoline was designed as a piece of specialized training equipment for specific sports. Pediatricians should only endorse use of trampolines as part of a structured training program with appropriate coaching, supervision, and safety measures in place. In addition to the aforementioned recommendations, the following apply to trampolines used in the training setting:
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7-foot, enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Kids will have a ton of bouncing fun with this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline, parents will love the easy folding feature for storing. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too! The simple folding design makes this Easy Store 7ft. Trampoline is easy to move around the yard. When the jumping is done fold it up and move to where ever you want to store it.
This trampoline is very easy to assemble and it can be done by a single person within 5 minutes. It is a specially designed trampoline for kids and this trampoline can bear weight about 150 pounds. The bouncer mat is made up of high-quality material and it also has a circular foam pad to enhance safety features. The disassembly of this trampoline is very easy. There is a handle that offers complete grip and support to the kid. This handle is padded for safety.

My 12 year old daughter goes through mini trampolines a few times a year because she uses it regularly for sensory stimulation. This particular one has lasted the longest( usually 3-4 months) rather than the Gold's Gym mini trampoline (lasted 1 month). The most problematic part of assembly of the Stamina is the need for two people to safely unfold it, however, it is still quite easy to assemble after this step-just screw on the legs and go!


Sternal injuries have traditionally been described as a result of major trauma. However, several case reports23 have been published of children between 10 and 11 years old suffering from isolated trampoline-related sternal fracture or manubriosternal dislocation. These occur after thoracic hyperflexion injuries on the trampoline.23,24 They typically heal uneventfully; however, surgical stabilization may be necessary if pain persists.24
The National Diabetes Education Program website states that "currently, because 10 to 15 percent of children and teens are overweight-about double the number of two decades ago-increasing numbers of young people have type 2 diabetes. In several clinic-based studies, the percentage of children with newly diagnosed diabetes classified as type 2 has increased from less than 5 percent before 1994 to 30-50 percent in subsequent years."
If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.

Many cheap trampolines use a PE material which will probably require replacing annually as the material tends to crack in the sunlight. Spending a little more on better quality spring padding can save money in the long run.
I have used a rebounder in Hawaii for over 20 years, bought another one in Australia and got another one this last month...Locally I have carried it with me in the car and on planes.It is far better impact on my feet/ ankles/legs than pounding on concrete surfaces. Found a great book with many many specific exercises, made a chart of them and laminated it so it can go with me too.30 minutes of simply jogging have been an excellent 'wake up' exercise for me in the AM and a gentle 'slow down' at night.
I can actually say this is the first time in years I've really enjoyed exercising. I can do it anytime I want. Instead of sitting, I do exercises instead. Instead of taking a nap, I do some runs instead. And the best part, I know this is better for me & helps me get back in shape. Have already lost some pounds without even feeling like I'm depriving myself or on a diet. Just do this & watch what I eat. No more extra time for snacking.
What about mini-trampolines (also called rebounders)? The AAP does not take a position on these, perhaps because they are intended to be used by adults for fitness. And like the kid versions designed for indoor use, they are also low to the ground and sometimes have a safety handle. If you have a mini-trampoline at home, limit use to one person at a time and make sure the surrounding area is clear of any hard objects or surfaces.
In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 
In a world where we're increasingly distracted by technology, keeping us glued to our couches and our screens, we have to remember to encourage physical activity. Having a trampoline is an easy way to get fun, accessible exercise for the whole family! If you're considering buying a bouncy addition for your backyard, you might be concerned about how to keep your children safe on the trampoline.
Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. CHIRPP Injury Report. Injuries Associated With Backyard Trampolines: 1999–2003 (full) and 2004–2006 Update (Limited), All Ages. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2006. Available at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/injury-bles/chirpp/injrep-rapbles/pdf/trampolines-eng.pdf. Accessed January 3, 2012
The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up.

Stamina 36-inch trampoline is a foldable and portable trampoline that suits all the persons. This mini trampoline suits the kids better than the adults. There are 6 legs in this trampoline which offers complete grip to the user. The leg tips are covered with rubber so that it is completely safe to use on any floors. The frame is made up of high-quality steel that has corrosion resistant technology. The pad surrounding the bouncer mat is made up of thick soft foam that ensures complete safety to the user. The maximum weight bearing capacity offered by this bouncer is about 250 lbs and it suits both kids and adults.
Did some research and bought another quite popular model by another brand at about $300 to $350. "Wow" was how we felt when jumping on the new expensive one. So much bouncier and you can jump very comfortably for so much longer with little effort. We couldn't stop laughing when we compared the two side by side because jumping on them felt SO different. Now my 12 year old enjoys jumping on the new one so much that she often stays on it for half an hour or more until I push her to do something else.
Windy conditions might not be the scariest of mother nature's mood swings, but they can escalate quickly and create dangerous situations (I mean, tornadoes, am I right?). The honest truth is that it can be quite hazardous to jump on your trampoline during high winds, or even stand near your trampoline in gusty conditions. Trampolines can become airborne, and cause significant damage to your property, your trampoline, and even yourself.
Parents: At JumpSport, we prod, measure, stretch, slam into, test, bounce on, and review 40+ criteria to make sure show that we live up to our mission of keeping your family safe. Based on our 20 years of leadership in the industry, and with over 17 patents and pioneering safety innovations, we know that safety is only good if it lasts. Typical, low-priced trampolines, and even some high-priced modes, quickly become unsafe and actually cost more per year to maintain safe use or to replace compared with JumpSport and AlleyOOP trampolines.
I have used a rebounder in Hawaii for over 20 years, bought another one in Australia and got another one this last month...Locally I have carried it with me in the car and on planes.It is far better impact on my feet/ ankles/legs than pounding on concrete surfaces. Found a great book with many many specific exercises, made a chart of them and laminated it so it can go with me too.30 minutes of simply jogging have been an excellent 'wake up' exercise for me in the AM and a gentle 'slow down' at night.
If your take on all this is Screw it, I'm still going to let my kid jump on trampolines, I get it. Weiss, the orthopedic surgeon, admitted to me over the phone that she sometimes lets her kids jump. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do about the trampoline sitting ominously my kids' playroom. They love it, and I want my kids to have fun and stay active. The point of this article is not to scare you into dumping your trampoline in the garbage; the point is to provide you with facts so that whatever decision you make will be informed, and so that you can minimize the danger by setting a few guidelines if you want. It can be well worth it to let your children take risks—as long as you know enough about what those risks are.
The most obvious risk of trampoline use is the ability to propel oneself to greater heights off a trampoline than from a jump on the ground. Falls from the trampoline can be severe and accounted for 27% to 39% of all trampoline-associated injuries.10,16,17 Risk of falling is increased by the "off-balance" bounce that occurs when the trampoline is placed on an uneven surface, and children who fall off the mat are more likely to be injured if they make contact with nearby trees or other ground obstacles.
Some trampoline models promoted as safe can have some major weaknesses and flaws particularly the budget trampolines which are often made of low quality materials and are poorly constructed. Ensure that the tubing used for the trampoline is of adequate thickness to prevent breakages and that the trampoline is not too light weight which may cause it to move around or flip over during use.
Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.

Not everybody has the time or capability to run a mile every day or go biking across town. Many people recognize a need to exercise but look for more efficient ways to get it done. The best thing about exercising with a rebounder trampoline is that you can be right at home watching your favorite TV show while keeping up with your cardio. It is also really great for your lymphatic and immune system. Those with small children or people they need to keep an eye on will find it convenient to exercise from the comfort of their living room.


This can also help with cellulite removal. Cellulite isn't formed by having too much fat - it's caused by excess toxins in your lymphatic system. So by rebounding, not only will you feel healthier day in and day out, but you'll also look healthier if you currently have cellulite. (Ladies, this is especially true if you have it on your butts and thighs.)
The special feature of the urban rebounder trampoline is the two different sizes of hinge legs. These legs offer a versatile workout to the user. The frames in this trampoline are made up of solid metal with corrosion resistant technology. The bouncer mat is made up of highly durable mesh material. This trampoline folds easily and it occupies very small space for storage. The jumping surface is very soft and it is connected to the mat with the help of the springs. The weight bearing capacity of this trampoline is about 300 pounds and suits the best for adults and kids.
Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."
Springless or springfree trampolines use reinforced fibreglass rods or elastic rather then springs. These trampoline are often promoted as safer then trampolines with springs. However because of their design the entire surface rotates each time the user hits the mat. This can cause pain and discomfort and even result in long term damage to the knees over time. Also many of the cheap models create an inferior bounce compared to the spring trampolines.
Rebound training is challenging, easy on your joints, and lets you slowly progress at your own speed by adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, creating a challenging cardiovascular workout. Best of all for the at-home fitness enthusiast, it doesn't require a great deal of space or expensive equipment -- simply an open spot of floor, and perhaps a training DVD or two. Rebound training has been shown to:
The weight and thickness of your padding will contribute to the longevity and protection it gives you. For example, light-weight or low-density pad will compress after a few uses, losing its ability to absorb energy from jumpers. Be sure the padding covers every part of the springs. Pads are the most frequently replaced safety feature on a trampoline. Any warranty over a year is indicative of a high quality pad.
What I found interesting was that instead of metal springs like you would find in most trampolines, this one uses thirty two-inch wide tension bands placed around the frame. This is probably to help it fold more easily, but I liked the idea that it would have fewer metal parts in general since those can be sharp and if I'm going to be playing with the frame frequently, I'd rather avoid things that could cut or scratch me.

This trampoline is very easy to assemble and it can be done by a single person within 5 minutes. It is a specially designed trampoline for kids and this trampoline can bear weight about 150 pounds. The bouncer mat is made up of high-quality material and it also has a circular foam pad to enhance safety features. The disassembly of this trampoline is very easy. There is a handle that offers complete grip and support to the kid. This handle is padded for safety.


Rebound training is challenging, easy on your joints, and lets you slowly progress at your own speed by adding hand or ankle weights to your routine, creating a challenging cardiovascular workout. Best of all for the at-home fitness enthusiast, it doesn't require a great deal of space or expensive equipment -- simply an open spot of floor, and perhaps a training DVD or two. Rebound training has been shown to:
In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.

My 12 year old daughter goes through mini trampolines a few times a year because she uses it regularly for sensory stimulation. This particular one has lasted the longest( usually 3-4 months) rather than the Gold's Gym mini trampoline (lasted 1 month). The most problematic part of assembly of the Stamina is the need for two people to safely unfold it, however, it is still quite easy to assemble after this step-just screw on the legs and go!

This Stamina product is meant for rebounding. Rebounding training is very beneficial to the body. It builds a cardiovascular workout by adding weights to hands and ankles. It stimulates the oxygen flow of the body and stimulates metabolism. For at home exercise, this product is extremely cheap and comfortable to use. So, now you do not need to make rounds to the gym.
Next came the padded frame mat. This was also very tight and difficult to do with one person. There are a number of holes in it where the bases of the legs go through. We both put it on and took it off the frame once by ourselves, but it was not easy and I already wasn't looking forward to putting it on every time I wanted to use the trampoline. It helped that the holes for the leg bases kept the pad from slipping, or I wouldn't have been able to do it by myself.

While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.

Encourage them to bounce in the centre of the trampoline and keep other children back away from the trampoline. Never let them go underneath a trampoline.
Some trampoline models promoted as safe can have some major weaknesses and flaws particularly the budget trampolines which are often made of low quality materials and are poorly constructed. Ensure that the tubing used for the trampoline is of adequate thickness to prevent breakages and that the trampoline is not too light weight which may cause it to move around or flip over during use.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
No research documents the injury patterns or rates that occur specifically in the structured training environment or with competitive trampoline events. Given the significant differences between the recreational and the structured training settings, extrapolation of data from the recreational setting to a formal training program is not appropriate. This is an area in which more research is warranted.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)

This Stamina product is meant for rebounding. Rebounding training is very beneficial to the body. It builds a cardiovascular workout by adding weights to hands and ankles. It stimulates the oxygen flow of the body and stimulates metabolism. For at home exercise, this product is extremely cheap and comfortable to use. So, now you do not need to make rounds to the gym.
Always be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use, including proper staking and maximum weight and child limits. Whenever possible, limit jumpers to one at a time in order to prevent injuries and do not allow children to somersault on a trampoline as this is one of the leading causes of serious injuries. Proper adult supervision is essential.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.

Rebounders have been around since 1975 and have a few different names, mini trampolines, fitness trampoline or exercise trampoline but they all mean the same thing, ‘the best exercise to stay fit'.  These little exercise trampolines are perfect for everyone no matter what your age or fitness level.  They are really easy to assemble, most of then can be setup in around 10 mins.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports an estimated 75,397 trampoline-related injuries in children 14 years and younger in 1998; that number rose to 77,892 in 1999. Most of these injuries occurred at the child's home and on a full size trampoline. Injuries and deaths from trampoline use most often occur by landing improperly while jumping or doing stunts; falling or jumping off the trampoline; falling on the springs or frame of the trampoline; and colliding with another person.
I have used a rebounder in Hawaii for over 20 years, bought another one in Australia and got another one this last month...Locally I have carried it with me in the car and on planes.It is far better impact on my feet/ ankles/legs than pounding on concrete surfaces. Found a great book with many many specific exercises, made a chart of them and laminated it so it can go with me too.30 minutes of simply jogging have been an excellent 'wake up' exercise for me in the AM and a gentle 'slow down' at night.

The American Academy of Pediatrics goes even further, advising against trampoline use for all children, saying that enclosures and padding may not prevent all injuries and can provide a false sense of security. However, if parents do allow children to use them, the group recommends constant adult supervision, avoiding somersaults and flips and restricting use to a single jumper at a time.  

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