Shop For Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In West Bradenton FL


Never let more than one child use the trampoline at the same time. Statistics show that accidents are much more likely when two or more persons are using the trampoline at the same time with the lightest person most likely to be injured.

I love the Little tikes trampoline line. So of course I love the biggest version. We are a trampoline family! It's our favorite pass time during the summer and fall months. Trust me when I say the quality is a big deal with trampolines. We've had many break at the seam after only a month or so of use. This material feels strong and the stitching is well done. Looking forward to a fun summer with screams of joy from the kiddos jumping on this! Please note I am writing this review as a part of a contest but my statements are true!

Next came the padded frame mat. This was also very tight and difficult to do with one person. There are a number of holes in it where the bases of the legs go through. We both put it on and took it off the frame once by ourselves, but it was not easy and I already wasn't looking forward to putting it on every time I wanted to use the trampoline. It helped that the holes for the leg bases kept the pad from slipping, or I wouldn't have been able to do it by myself.
The Stamina 36 inch Trampoline stands on 6 legs. These legs are made of steel, hence rust resistant. They provide a strong structure to the frame. These legs are rubber-tipped so they do provide a stable structure to the trampoline. These legs are detachable as well, so you can keep de-assemble the structure is ever needed. Hence, stability and support are sure to be imparted in this product.
In fact, they're the main reason I went to such lengths to put this through its paces. While I can't speak for the future, so far there don't seem to be any problems with mine and this was the time when most of the negative reviews said things started to go wrong. I certainly don't doubt the people who had those experiences, but considering the number of reviews mentioning this, it might have been a defect with those particular items rather than a more widespread problem.
We've had this trampoline for about 7 months now and after 6 months of use the bungee cord, that holds the net in place, broke due to normal use with children in the weight range that the trampoline specifies it's for. When we took the bungee cord off, it was quite worn in the places that it was wrapped around the trampoline frame so it was inevitable that it would snap. I did contact Galt and they replaced the bungee cord at no cost to me. I expect that it will probably break again down the line.
Next came the padded frame mat. This was also very tight and difficult to do with one person. There are a number of holes in it where the bases of the legs go through. We both put it on and took it off the frame once by ourselves, but it was not easy and I already wasn't looking forward to putting it on every time I wanted to use the trampoline. It helped that the holes for the leg bases kept the pad from slipping, or I wouldn't have been able to do it by myself.
Don't be tempted to use a spring that is a different length than those you have. It will cause the performance of your trampoline to be reduced significantly.
"I think parents see the soft springy mat and they think it's safe, like water," LaBotz said. "What they don't realize is that once you get it to bouncing, especially if there are multiple users, it can be dangerous. Bigger kids and adults like to rocket propel up the little kids, getting them to bounce higher than they would otherwise and if the kid comes down wrong, it is the same as falling 9 or 10 feet onto a hard surface."
There's obviously a big difference between outdoor trampolines, from which kids can easily fall onto the ground, and indoor trampoline parks, where trampolines are connected to prevent such falls. But research suggests that these parks incite a lot of injuries, too. In a 2016 study, researchers compared the number of trampoline injuries recorded by the CSPC that took place at home versus at trampoline parks. They found that while far more kids get hurt on trampolines at home—probably in part because kids spend more time trampolining at home—the number of ER-worthy injuries that happened at parks rose almost twelvefold, from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014, as trampoline parks became much more popular. (According to the International Association of Trampoline Parks, there were only about 40 trampoline parks worldwide in 2011 and as many as 550 by the end of 2015.) The types of injuries that afflict kids at home versus in these parks differ, too: Kids at home tend to sustain more head injuries than kids in parks do, while kids at parks tend to suffer more lower-body injuries, including broken bones and sprains. Indeed, "almost half of the injuries in kids under 6 were fractures," explains study author Kathryn Kasmire, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Connecticut Children's Medical Center. There's even a type of fracture doctors call "trampoline ankle."

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Don't be tempted to use a spring that is a different length than those you have. It will cause the performance of your trampoline to be reduced significantly.
Never let more than one child use the trampoline at the same time. Statistics show that accidents are much more likely when two or more persons are using the trampoline at the same time with the lightest person most likely to be injured.
Now we have designed this trampoline for tots, preschoolers, and fundamental faculty kids. The massive 7′, enclosed, bouncing house is Sturdy and has simply the correct quantity of soar. The netting on each side is helping stay kids protected, and the padded body supplies additional coverage. Now, this vintage trampoline additionally options simple folding and garage, too!
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7', enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too!
A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.

So far, it doesn't seem to be showing many signs of wear and tear. The padded frame mat looks a little shoddy now, which is disappointing after such a short period of time, but on an up note it's easier to put on. I would like to think that's because I've gotten stronger in the intervening time, but really it's more likely that the elastic portions are getting stretched out from repeated use. For the moment, it still does its job of giving a little bit of cushion to the frame itself, though without metal springs to protect me from it seems a bit extraneous.

The only downside I encountered (besides struggling to figure out how to properly lace the mat to the frame) is how easily the screws fall out during use. After about five minutes of use, I will hear the sound of a metal screw hitting the floor. Sure enough, a screw from the underside (used to attach one frame piece to a neighboring piece) had slipped loose and dropped. I have to keep the hex key in a nearby drawer to tighten it back up.

Trampoline Jump Mat: The trampoline mat may have holes in it caused by things falling on it like branches or fireworks (a common culprit!) or even a cigarette end. The trampoline mat (or jump mat as it is sometimes known) can be replaced. You will need to know the size of your trampoline, the shape of it and the number of springs it has to attach to. You may also need a spring tool to remove the old trampoline mat and install the new one. It can be hard work to do this without a spring tool. Make sure that any new trampoline mat is made of A grade Permatron Polypropylene, which is UV resistant, and sewn with UV resistant thread. The V rings to attach to the springs should also be galvanised to prevent rust.
This one is pretty obvious… make sure there's nothing under the trampoline! The trampoline should be on a level surface, and check underneath to make sure there's no toys, pets, chickens, pet chickens, little brothers or sisters, big pointy things, boulders, etc. I think it's safe to say that the only thing that should be under your trampoline is grass. Or dirt depending on if your lawn isn't doing so hot this year.
Finally, the legs. These I was really impressed with. Each leg base on the frame is covered with a rubber cap that you can unscrew to reveal a small metal dowel. This design I thought was really clever: instead of a thin, sharp screw that pokes up into the legs, these were large, squat screws just smaller than the leg diameter with threading along the outside. Not only is this more stable, but less likely to poke me when I'm assembling and disassembling this. Orthopedic injuries associated with backyard trampoline use in children
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