How Can I Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In West Melbourne FL


Never let more than one child use the trampoline at the same time. Statistics show that accidents are much more likely when two or more persons are using the trampoline at the same time with the lightest person most likely to be injured.

With spring nearly upon us, many of you will now be venturing into the garden to tidy up and make preparations for the new Season. If you have a trampoline and it's looking a little tired after the long cold winter, here are some tips to help restore it to its former glory.
What to consider when buying: Spending a bit more money on a trampoline and purchasing safety pads and safety nets can greatly reduce the risk of injury.
Although rates of extremity injuries are high, often the most frightening and alarming trampoline injuries are those to the head and neck. Many reports have revealed that head and/or neck injuries accounted for 10% to 17% of all trampoline-related injuries,3,11,12,20 and 0.5% of all trampoline injuries resulted in permanent neurologic damage.21 Head injuries occurred most commonly with falls from the trampoline.20 Cervical spine injuries can happen with falls but also commonly occur on the trampoline mat when failed somersaults or flips cause hyperflexion or hyperextension of the cervical spine. These injuries can be the most catastrophic of all trampoline injuries suffered.
Next came the padded frame mat. This was also very tight and difficult to do with one person. There are a number of holes in it where the bases of the legs go through. We both put it on and took it off the frame once by ourselves, but it was not easy and I already wasn't looking forward to putting it on every time I wanted to use the trampoline. It helped that the holes for the leg bases kept the pad from slipping, or I wouldn't have been able to do it by myself.
Don't be tempted to use a spring that is a different length than those you have. It will cause the performance of your trampoline to be reduced significantly.
Trampolining is a low impact, low stress workout for the body. 10 – 20 minutes of trampolining is about equal to half an hour of jogging! Because the trampoline mat absorbs some of the shock of impact, there is no strain on the joints. A repeated low impact exercise builds and strengthens the bones and muscles which results in toning, better balance, co-ordination and good posture. It has also been proven to reduce the risk of arthritis and osteoporosis.
In conclusion, the trampoline gets so many mixed reviews that it's really up to you if you're willing to take a chance. Keep in mind that a good rebounding trampoline will give you the kind of exercise you need, but if you don't want to take a risk on setting up this trampoline (which could be a challenge) and are concerned about the smell or about any of the other things you see listed above, then you may want to look at a different model. In general, trampoline exercise is among the best you can do for yourself, but you will want to purchase a trampoline that offers you everything you need, and your safety and ease of use should always be paramount concerns.
If some of the trampoline enclosure poles, top caps or sleeves are missing, or damaged, then these can easily be replaced too rather than buying a whole new trampoline enclosure kit.
No research documents the injury patterns or rates that occur specifically in the structured training environment or with competitive trampoline events. Given the significant differences between the recreational and the structured training settings, extrapolation of data from the recreational setting to a formal training program is not appropriate. This is an area in which more research is warranted.
We've designed this trampoline for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children. The large 7', enclosed, bouncing area is durable and has just the right amount of bounce. The netting on all sides helps keep children safe, and the padded frame provides extra protection. Now, this classic trampoline also features easy folding and storage, too!
When you're bouncing your way to better health together, it's important to jump under the best conditions to ensure trampoline safety — so everyone can enjoy some hazard-free physical fun that will keep your kids interested in exercise. If you're wondering how to lessen trampoline injuries and keep your kids safe, SkyBound USA is here to help. Here are our top tips for trampoline safety:
It is a quarter-folding trampoline and really doesn't take up much space when stored. Bear in mind you'll have to remove the legs first, and you'll need Herculean power to fold it the first time, as the bungee cords, thirty in total, won't budge at first. These elastic bands aren't noisy, but don't expect them to last as long as the spring-based trampolines, especially if heavier people are to bounce on it.
While the trampoline is in its working order, it's great. My kids love it and use it daily. It's got great bounce and the frame is metal. I like that it can fold up and that it has a cover over the bungee cord. Just a word of caution, the cover isn't thick and the frame is metal. We've had some banged up shins over this issue. We've put cut up pool noodles on the sides to eliminate this issue.
A good safety pad will cover the outer frame, the springs and hooks. A good safety enclosure or net will cover the inside of the outer rail of the trampoline. The outer rail is the circular bar to which trampoline springs are attached. This will not just prevent falls onto the ground but also on the hard outer surface of the trampoline where accidents are common.
Trampoline Storage. When not in use ensure that the trampoline is kept dry to prevent rusting and that the mat is kept away from the sun as the ultraviolet rays of the sun can corrode the mat.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
For starters, don't get a rebounder if you want to have fun. Rebounder trampolines aren't for recreational jumping. In fact, you will get bored with a rebounder trampoline pretty quickly even if you expect it to be fun. However, it is a wonderful exercise tool if you would rather jump on a trampoline then practice another form of cardiovascular exercise such as running or biking, then a rebounder trampoline is perfect for your needs.
According to the royal society for the prevention of accidents approximately 75% of injuries occur when more than one person is on the trampoline with the person weighing less five times more likely to be injured. Children of a young age are particularly vulnerable to injury. Also unless the child is supervised by a trained 'spotter', adult supervision seems to do little to prevent accidents with about half of all injuries occurring with adult supervision.
The evolving pattern of trampoline use and injury resulted in a series of published policy statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 1977, 1981, and 1999.1–3 The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons issued trampoline safety position statements in 2005 and 2010.4 The Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine issued a joint statement on trampoline use in 2007.5 These statements all discouraged recreational and playground use of trampolines and urged caution with and further study of trampoline use in supervised training and physical education settings.

Over the past several decades, national estimates of trampoline injury numbers have been generated annually by using the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (USCPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS).6 Trampoline injuries increased throughout the 1990s, with case numbers more than doubling between 1991 and 1996 (from approx 39 000 to >83 000 injuries per year). Injury rates and trampoline sales both peaked in 2004 and have been decreasing since then (Table 1).6,7 As home trampoline use appears to be waning, commercial trampoline parks and other trampoline installations have been emerging over the past several years. Although indoor commercial parks typically consist of multiple contiguous trampoline mats with padded borders, other setups are highly variable. Any effect of these facilities on trampoline injury trends should be monitored but is not yet evident.


This rebounder is a personal sized trampoline that is sturdy and fills that hard to fill niche in your fitness regimen. The high-quality materials and superior construction guarantee that this rebounder will last for years, giving you an endless amount of fun and fitness for your one-time investment. Most personal sized trampolines are not tall enough to support full sized adult jumping, and not strong enough to be used not only as a fun diversion- but also as a serious exercise tool.
Never place the trampoline on a hard surface such as concrete. A fall on a hard surface is significantly more likely to result in serious injury. If you do not have a soft grassy lawn you can purchase bark wood chip or sand to go around the trampoline.

I love this trampoline! I have been using mine about 3-4 times a week for just over a month. I have never jumped before but thought it might be fun to jump. I do have a past injury to my knee (torn meniscus) so I've always been hesitant to do too much high impact activity. I have found jumping to be easy and I haven't had one problem with my knee yet.
Exposed or damaged springs can be hazards for falls and feet. Keep up with the condition of your springs to increase trampoline safety for everyone. Your springs should be sturdy, intact, tight, properly fixed in position and securely attached at either end. Springs can sometimes stretch out and become corroded or rusty over time, in which case you'll need to replace them. Loose springs can affect the dynamics of trampoline movement and cause jumpers to fall if they detach, while missing springs can cause tears in the jump mat. Also, look out for hanging springs beneath your protective padding, which run the risk of snagging clothing or skin if unattended.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
To make sure your jumping surface is up for a lot of bouncy feet, you should regularly inspect it and make sure everything is in good shape. Your shock-absorbing jump surface should be well-secured and taut — but not attached too tightly. The action of repetitive jumping needs a somewhat forgiving surface to allow for smoothness and force-absorption. 
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