Buy Little Tikes Folding Trampoline In Conway FL


Just like working out, jumping requires the right kind of clothing. Some outfits can be uncomfortable or dangerous on the trampoline, catching on netting, poles and springs or causing an awkward landing that could lead to injuries. To minimize these risks and make sure your kids have safe fun, avoid clothing with drawstrings and pants or dresses that are too baggy or long, which could lead to tripping. 


Several cases of vertebral artery dissection presenting 12 to 24 hours after a neck injury on the trampoline have been reported. Vertebral artery dissections are the result of abrupt cervical hyperextension and rotation. Trauma to the artery may result in an intramural thrombus, which can cause a subsequent dissection of the vessel and possible intracranial emboli. These are often devastating injuries and may produce lasting neurologic complications.25,26 Any neck pain associated with trampoline use requires prompt medical evaluation and diagnostic assessment.
But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
Always supervise children and avoid allowing them to practice somersaults. These should only be performed in a properly organised club. Also exit a trampoline the proper way, not by jumping off!
Then several months ago, I read a blog article talking about the health benefits that the blogger had by doing rebounder exercises in the past 2 years and how he eventually bought three different rebounders ($ to $$$, with this one being the first bought) and how the expensive one felt so much better. So I thought, hm, maybe I should try a better one too.
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10
Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. An AAP data review showed that 29 percent of injuries in kids ages 6 to 17 were fractures or dislocations. But these accounted for almost half of the injuries among kids 5 and under. Most worrying are injuries to the head and neck, which make up 10 to 17 percent of all trampoline-related injuries and could result in paralysis or other permanent disability.
Competitive trampoline programs use a rectangular trampoline that is significantly different in size, quality, and cost than a recreational trampoline. Competition-style trampolines have center mats that are 7 ft by 14 ft. They are surrounded by a rim of padding over the springs and the 10-ft by 17-ft frame. These trampolines are raised off the ground and have 6 ft of end-deck padding. They do not have enclosure netting present. Within the competition setting, these trampolines have an additional 5- to 6-ft radius of padding present on the floor. In the training setting, competitive trampolines may be either raised off the ground, or "pit" trampolines, which are located at ground level. Either a bungee system or a rope and pulley system with a harness is used as athletes master tumbling skills.

Patterns of injury vary by patient age. In retrospective reviews, individuals younger than 6 years accounted for 22% to 37% of individuals with a trampoline-related injury presenting to emergency departments for evaluation.8,16 Although most trampoline injuries are sprains, strains, contusions, or other soft tissue injury, younger children seem to be more prone to bony injury.11,18 According to an analysis of data from the NEISS, 29% of injuries in the 6- to 17-year age group resulted in fractures or dislocations, as compared with 48% in children 5 years and younger.18 Data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program revealed higher rates of hospitalization for trampoline injuries in children younger than 4 years as compared with their older counterparts.9

Many of these accidents can be reduced by following some simple guidelines. It is also important to ensure you purchase the right trampoline and trampoline accessories. Trampoline nets and trampoline padding can prevent or reduce injury considerably.

First off, this EXERCISE trampoline is NOT meant for children. There's even an important notice paper that comes with it stating that this is not meant for children. This is an exercise trampoline for ADULTS. Also, you can register your product as soon as you get it which means you can get replacements if something breaks without having to pay for another one.
In order to prevent animals, objects, (or small children) from camping out under your trampoline, a few of our accessories double as a safety barrier. Our Sure Shot Lower Enclosure Net Accessory Game is a net that wraps around the bottom legs of the trampoline, which features a fun bounce back game for target practice, but also prevents small objects or children from venturing underneath the jumping area.
Now for a little good news: Setting some ground rules should minimize your kids' risk of injury. First, don't let kids under 6 jump, as they are most likely to get hurt. Second, don't let more than one kid jump at a time. I know, what a buzzkill, but three-quarters of trampoline injuries happen when more than one person jumps simultaneously. Little kids who jump with big kids or adults are especially at risk—in fact, they're a whopping 14 times more likely than the bigger jumpers to get hurt. That's because they can be easily smooshed in a collision; because they can be projected so high (remember double bounces as a kid when you jumped with someone else?); and because if a little kid happens to land on the trampoline when the mat has recoiled upward due to another person's jump, there is "significant upward impaction force applied to the descending child's legs" as one study explains—which in wee ones can lead to injuries (including broken legs). Other risky maneuvers that are best avoided: flips and somersaults, which according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, are "the most common causes of permanent and devastating cervical spine injuries." If you're surprised by all this, you're not alone. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents recently surveyed knew that kids under 6 shouldn't use trampolines, while less than half knew that multiple kids should never jump at the same time, according to a study that will soon be published in the journal Academic Pediatrics.
Many people who give up running complain that their feet and ankles simply can't handle the workout anymore. If this is you, then you should consider using a rebounder trampoline. Since the trampoline mat and springs will absorb most of the pressure from your workout, you can still get a great workout without sacrificing your feet and ankle joints as much.
Doctors tell people not to smoke and only to drink in moderation—that doesn't mean people don't do those things. Life involves inevitable risk, and no one is saying you shouldn't ever bounce. They're saying, "bounce your heart out! Just remember that this is kind of dangerous and you should treat it as a risky activity." They're also definitely saying not to let toddlers on there. And that if you go to a trampoline park, remember that there are zero regulations for running them, and that the 20-year-old who signed you in cannot and will not protect you from harm.
Don't be tempted to use a spring that is a different length than those you have. It will cause the performance of your trampoline to be reduced significantly.
The number of actual injuries caused by trampolines is likely to be quite higher than this, as the data from the CPSC reporting system only looked at those injuries which resulted in medical treatment at one of 100 participating hospitals, and minor injuries were likely treated at home or another medical treatment facility not included in the reporting data.
When you use a rebounder trampoline you will constantly be practicing your balance and building the muscles which help keep you on your feet. As you get older, the threat that a fall can have on your body becomes increasingly more dangerous. Nobody likes to hear that a loved one has broken a bone because they fell down. Especially when it is one of our elderly loved ones. The older you get, the more fragile your muscles get. Save your friends and family the heartbreak and keep up with your balancing muscles so that we never have to receive that call.

But what's the likelihood that your kid is going to get hurt? That's a lot harder to figure out. For one thing, we don't have good data on how many kids jump on trampolines and how frequently, which is crucial to answering the question. Using data from a national sample of hospitals, the Consumer Product Safety Commission devises national estimates of how many product-related injuries result in emergency room visits. It estimated that last year among kids under 18, there were 103,512 ER visits due to trampoline accidents. That sounds like a lot, and it is. But that number doesn't tell you anything about how likely it is that one particular kid will end up in the ER after jumping on a trampoline for, say, half an hour—to get there, we'd need to know how much exposure kids have to trampolines. If 20 million kids each jumped on trampolines for two hours a day and there were 103,512 trampoline-induced ER visits, that would be less concerning than if only 1 million kids jumped, and only for a few minutes here and there, yet this infrequent use still resulted in 103,512 ER trips.
The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in their online article Physical Activity and the Health of Young People, states that "children and adolescents who are overweight are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Overweight adults are at increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, some types of cancer, and gallbladder disease." (For full text and references please click here)

Pediatricians should counsel their patients and families against recreational trampoline use and explain that current data indicate safety measures have not significantly reduced injury rates and that catastrophic injuries do occur. For families who persist in home trampoline use despite this recommendation, pediatricians should advise parents and their children on the following guidelines until better information becomes available:
Springless or springfree trampolines use reinforced fibreglass rods or elastic rather then springs. These trampoline are often promoted as safer then trampolines with springs. However because of their design the entire surface rotates each time the user hits the mat. This can cause pain and discomfort and even result in long term damage to the knees over time. Also many of the cheap models create an inferior bounce compared to the spring trampolines.
This trampoline has an easy set up, and though it's said that you might need two people to set it up, if there's just one of you, you can use your body weight to unfold it on your own. This trampoline also bounces really well, and it's neither overly stiff nor overly flexible, so you can make it work just perfectly. There is a chance that, if you jump, you will improve your posture over time. You may also notice that if you jump, your lymph nodes will drain, and you will feel that the trampoline is a good health investment.

First, it's probably a good idea to lower the enclosure poles of your trampoline, as the enclosure net acts as a sail and can pick up your trampoline with a good wind storm. It's also a good idea to invest in steel wind stakes, which will help anchor your trampoline to the ground. And last of all, please don't just stand by your trampoline when a storm is approaching. We don't know why you would… but better not.
This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.
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My Kids love this Galt trampoline. They bounce on it every day. They can bounce a few times here and there throughout the day and sometimes bounces on it while watching T.V. It is in our playroom. I think it is just the right size for them! It did take two people to put together and some time. But it is worth it. It is made with a bungee cord instead of springs, which is much safer for kids. It has a cover for the edges so the kids legs don't slip through. The bar is nice to hold on too for balance.
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.
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Avoid them wearing or carrying anything hard like ipods or toys when jumping.
ORIGINAL REVIEW: By the time I was done reading all of the warnings, etc, I must confess, I was scared of severe injury or death and started having doubts about whether I even wanted to try it! I got it so that I could get some low-impact cardio as a way to break up the vast amount of time that I must spend on the computer (my job - but I mostly work from home). Going to the gym is great, but it's a minimum of 2 hours out of my day which is not always reasonable. Going for a walk is also great, but not always feasible (weather, etc). I looked into under-desk cyclers, etc, but I knew my knees would bang the underside of the desk (and it probably wouldn't add much cardio), so I decided to try the trampoline - it was very reasonably priced, and the reviews seemed good. Of course, it arrived on a day that I was home by myself, so I read all of the instructions where it says you must use 2 STRONG people to unfold it. I don't consider myself to be STRONG (they put the word STRONG in all caps - and I definitely don't consider myself STRONG in the all caps sense). In fact, they say you risk death if you try to unfold it by yourself as it could spring back and kill you - so you're supposed to get 2 STRONG people and hope that they trust each other enough that neither lets go while folding it back. I thought at first they might be over-exaggerating about how strong the tension was in the spring, but they weren't kidding - no way was I going to unfold this by myself without risking death...unless, as many of us weaklings discovered long ago, we use something as leverage. I took it outside and placed half of the rails under my porch railing - I fully trusted that my porch railing would not give way, and then pushed down on the other half of the trampoline railings until it popped open. It didn't appear completely locked in place, so I gingerly removed it, turned it right side up and pushed down on the rails until it was flat on the ground all the way around. I added the legs and then had fun figuring out how to get the protective coverring on it - the trick to getting that on by yourself is to hook one hole (there are 6 holes in the cover) over one of the leg threads, then screw on the leg to hold it in place. Pull it all the way across to the other side and do the same with that side. Then just work your way around.for each leg - it's actually pretty easy to do by yourself if you do it that way. So, within minutes I had it put together and jumping away! It seems quite sturdy and well-made, I think I will enjoy being able to get in some quick exercises while I'm working :)
However, rebounder trampolines are normally only two to four feet in diameter and only a couple feet off the ground. This means you can store them in your house and use them for exercise purposes. After all, it is a lot more fun to jump on a big trampoline than a rebounder trampoline. However, rebounder trampolines are designed for exercise, not for fun.
If any parts of the trampoline are damaged avoid use and purchase the correct replacements before continuing.
Three-quarters of all trampoline injuries happen when multiple people are on board. Bouncing alone means you're in control of how high you're going, and there aren't any stray vibrations to turn your controlled flip into a flying cannonball off the side. Plus you're not tempted into the inevitable competition to see who can go the highest. And most importantly, your kid won't bounce their noggin off another kid's noggin if they're jumping solo.

After taking it out of the bag, just picking it up had it falling open to an extent, but actually getting it to lock into place wasn't very easy. In fact, the instructions said that you should have two people. That wouldn't be feasible since one or the other of us is often home with the kids, so I tried to open it by myself by putting my weight on it, which ended up working pretty easily. There was a point when I thought I was going to break it, but I pushed through and suddenly it was fine.
Avoid bringing accessories and other objects onto the jumping surface. This means removing all jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings — especially accessories that are sharp. Check your kids' pockets for jagged, pointy or bulky forgotten items before they jump, and remove their hats or hairclips as well. Never wear shoes, as they can damage the jumping mat. Trampoline socks can be used to increase the traction on your children's feet and help reduce their likelihood of falling. 
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