How Can You Get A Little Tikes Folding Trampoline Discount In Rio FL


Trampoline jumping poses a high risk of injury for children. The activity can result in sprains and fractures in the arms or legs — as well as potentially serious head and neck injuries. The risk of injury is so high that the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages the use of trampolines at home. Trampoline park injuries also are an area of emerging concern.
Many of the families purchased recommended trampoline protective equipment, such as netting and padding, to prevent or lessen the impact of falls. However, trampoline injuries from accidental collisions and improper landing from jumping up and down still occurred. Similar accidents also occurred even on ground level trampolines, which are often touted as being safer than traditional above ground systems.
I love the Little tikes trampoline line. So of course I love the biggest version. We are a trampoline family! It's our favorite pass time during the summer and fall months. Trust me when I say the quality is a big deal with trampolines. We've had many break at the seam after only a month or so of use. This material feels strong and the stitching is well done. Looking forward to a fun summer with screams of joy from the kiddos jumping on this! Please note I am writing this review as a part of a contest but my statements are true!

We've all heard about trampolines. Especially from kids who tell stories about going to their friend's house and how fun it was to play games on their friend's trampoline. Did you know that trampolines aren't only good for recreational activity? Rebounder trampolines are a great way to get all of the exercise benefits of a normal trampoline without sacrificing too much space on your property.

"Unfortunately, injuries happen for the same reasons trampolines are fun," says Lori DeBold, M.D., vice chair of pediatrics at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, in Fountain Valley, California. "A child has some, but not total, control over how high she bounces and where she lands." Nearly two-thirds of trampoline accidents are caused by children jumping at the same time and crashing into one another. If you believe that the benefits of a backyard trampoline outweigh the risks, follow these rules from the safety experts.
In general, the more expensive the rebounder is, the better it is, but to choose the best rebounder for you, you need to look at rebounder reviews. Scroll up and click on one of the links to read the reviews for that particular model, and if one looks good, make the purchase! (Even if you hate rebounding, Amazon offers a no-questions-asked return policy.)
Unfortunately, the very forces that make trampoline use fun for many children also lead to unique injury mechanisms and patterns of injury. The trampoline industry has attempted to address the safety concerns with implementation of voluntary safety standards. In response to the 1999 AAP policy statement recommendation against consumer trampoline use, the USCPSC, the International Trampoline Industry Association, and the American Society of Testing and Materials Trampoline Subcommittee issued a revision of performance and safety standards. Equipment recommendations included the following: (1) extending padding to the frame and springs; (2) improving the quality of the padding; and (3) prohibiting inclusion of ladders in the packaging to help prevent young children from accessing the trampoline. Printed warnings were included with new trampoline equipment that recommended avoiding somersaulting, restricting multiple jumpers, and limiting trampoline use to children 6 years or older. Concerns have been raised as to whether these recommendations, in addition to other measures proposed in previous policy statements, have substantially affected the rate or severity of injuries.9,10
A comparison of trampoline injury prevalence with those from other sports and recreational activities provides a sense of the societal burden of injury; however, it does not reflect the true risk of trampoline use by an individual. Risk takes into account the exposure or frequency of a given activity, and unfortunately, exposure data for many recreational activities, including trampoline use, are difficult to define and measure. Trampoline injury rates for 2009 were 70 per 100 000 for 0- to 4-year-olds6 and increased to 160 per 100 000 for 5- to 14-year-olds. Injury rates attributable to bicycling and use of playground equipment were higher in these age groups, but population exposure was likely significantly greater in these 2 activities as well.
Remember when you remove the old bounce mat to take off the springs in even stages around the edge so as to maintain the tension across the bounce mat evenly until you only have four springs left attaching it at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock, then finally remove these. When installing the new mat start by putting these four springs on first and then build up the tension by gradually putting springs on to split the gaps. You will find this makes it much easier when you come to the final ones.
On your mark, get set and bounce! This Little Tikes Easy Store 3ft Folding Trampoline is all you need to keep your little one jumping no matter what time of the year. It is easy to move and set-up, so that kids can bounce anytime they like. This fun mini trampoline comes with a padded bar that stabilizes the bouncer as kids play, and a soft, padded cover protects your little ones as they climb on and off the trampoline.
Trampolines from Little Tikes are so much fun, your kids will never want to stop jumping! This Little Tikes 3-foot kid's trampoline is the perfect size to provide hours of bouncing fun! Little Tikes knows it is important for kids to stay active, and the 3-foot trampoline is easy to move so kids can bounce wherever they like any time they like! Now this best-selling trampoline has folding capabilities for easy storage, too! Also, this trampoline will make a fun gift for a special occasion. It is wonderful for low-impact exercise in a playroom or backyard. This product is ideal for offering lots of enjoyment and activity for your little ones. You are sure to be pleased with the Little Tikes 3' Trampoline, which is both convenient and functional.
Is the AAP made up exclusively of killjoys? Maybe. Then again, trampolines put kids in the hospital every year, and it's the AAP's job to try to prevent those injuries. Activities like swimming or biking definitely hospitalize more kids than trampolines, but since those are much more popular than trampoline-ing we don't know whether that's because swimming and biking are actually more dangerous or just more widespread. Either way, let's not kid ourselves here: trampolines aren't super safe. Are they the most dangerous childhood activity? No, of course not. But that doesn't mean we can't take some precautions.
Trampoline safety recommendations have consistently advised adult supervision when children are on the trampoline. However, multiple studies reveal that approximately one-third to one-half of injuries8,12,17–19 occurred despite reported adult supervision. These authors have raised concerns regarding supervision complacency, particularly when safety measures are in place, as well as lack of adult knowledge and intervention regarding risk behavior with trampoline use.

Lay out a set of ground rules for what they can do on the trampoline. For example, make sure no toys are on the trampoline when jumping, and limit the number of people who can be on it at a time. This will help to ensure the weight limit isn't exceeded as well as reduce the likelihood of collisions while jumping. You can involve the kids in this step by getting them to help you come up with the list of rules. Have the kids help you make a big sign — poster, wood, whatever medium you can use — and keep it near the trampoline or posted near their other outdoor toys. Encourage all kids who play on the trampoline to be "rule enforcers" — it could help keep everyone on their best behavior and encourage them to report unsafe play immediately.
"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," said LaBotz, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics executive council on sports medicine and fitness. "This is not a toy. It's a piece of equipment. We recommend that you not provide it for your family or your neighbors to use. But if you do use one, you need to be aware of the risks."

Sorry, but that padding on the springs isn't going to keep you from fracturing your collarbone. Maybe it will prevent some scrapes, just don't expect it to keep you totally safe. A lot of the padding that comes with trampolines breaks down quickly. You're supposed to replace it regularly, but when was the last time anyone did that? The role of every trampoline is to sit in the backyard rusting away, losing crucial joints and shedding padding until your parents pawn it off on whoever is willing to drag it away.

Backyard trampolines are more popular than ever, and kids love them. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year from 2010 to 2014, E.R. doctors treated more than 91,000 trampoline injuries, including head injuries, fractures, and sprains. In the worst-case scenarios, kids can end up paralyzed, brain damaged, or even killed. The younger and smaller a child is, the more likely he is to get hurt. Trampoline Park and Home Trampoline Injuries
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